Predicting health resilience in pediatric type 1 diabetes: A test of the resilience model framework

Jennifer M. Rohan, Bin Huang, Jennifer Shroff Pendley, Alan M Delamater, Lawrence Dolan, Grafton Reeves, Dennis Drotar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives This research examined whether individual and family-level factors during the transition from late childhood to early adolescence protected individuals from an increased risk of poor glycemic control across time, which is a predictor of future diabetes-related complications (i.e., health resilience). Methods This longitudinal, multisite study included 239 patients with type 1 diabetes and their caregivers. Glycemic control was based on hemoglobin A1c. Individual and family-level factors included: demographic variables, youth behavioral regulation, adherence (frequency of blood glucose monitoring), diabetes self-management, level of parental support for diabetes autonomy, level of youth mastery and responsibility for diabetes management, and diabetes-related family conflict. Results Longitudinal mixed-effects logistic regression indicated that testing blood glucose more frequently, better self-management, and less diabetes-related family conflict were indicators of health resilience. Conclusions Multiple individual and family-level factors predicted risk for future health complications. Future research should develop interventions targeting specific individual and family-level factors to sustain glycemic control within recommended targets, which reduces the risk of developing future health complications during the transition to adolescence and adulthood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)956-967
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume40
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 27 2014

Fingerprint

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Pediatrics
Family Conflict
Health
Self Care
Blood Glucose
Diabetes Complications
Caregivers
Longitudinal Studies
Hemoglobins
Logistic Models
Demography
Research

Keywords

  • diabetes
  • health promotion and prevention
  • longitudinal research
  • resilience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Predicting health resilience in pediatric type 1 diabetes : A test of the resilience model framework. / Rohan, Jennifer M.; Huang, Bin; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Delamater, Alan M; Dolan, Lawrence; Reeves, Grafton; Drotar, Dennis.

In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Vol. 40, No. 9, 27.10.2014, p. 956-967.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rohan, Jennifer M. ; Huang, Bin ; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff ; Delamater, Alan M ; Dolan, Lawrence ; Reeves, Grafton ; Drotar, Dennis. / Predicting health resilience in pediatric type 1 diabetes : A test of the resilience model framework. In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology. 2014 ; Vol. 40, No. 9. pp. 956-967.
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