Preclinical Simulation Training of Medical Students Results in Better Procedural Skills Performance in End of the Year Three Objective Structured Clinical Evaluation Assessments

Peggy A. Seidman, Lauren M. Maloney, Doreen M. Olvet, Latha Chandran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The Association of American Medical Colleges published guidelines for procedural skills to be included in medical school curricula; however, standardized training and objective assessments of procedural skills are limited. We implemented and evaluated a simulation-based mandatory procedural skills training program for preclinical medical students for nine procedures students were expected to gain proficiency before graduation. Methods: Students received didactic and simulated practice sessions on task simulators for each selected procedure. After completion of their primary clinical year of training, as part of the end of the year three clinical performance examination, students were tested using an objective structured clinical evaluation (OSCE) format on two of the skills taught in their procedural skills classes. Results: We report our educational experiences and the results of OSCE performance of five cohorts (n = 529) of trained students using simulations compared to a historical class cohort who were informally taught procedural skills at the patients’ bedside (n = 96). Tested at least a year after completion of standardized skills training, all five cohorts of simulation-trained students obtained better performance scores on their intravenous insertion skills compared to the bedside-trained group. For the Foley catheter insertion skills, however, only two of the simulation-trained cohorts performed significantly better than bedside-trained cohort. Conclusions: Our results suggest that simulation-based procedural skills training can be effectively incorporated into preclinical medical school curricula with retention of skills in tested procedures at the end of the primary clinical year as assessed in an OSCE format.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-96
Number of pages8
JournalMedical Science Educator
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Clinical skills
  • OSCE
  • Procedural skills training
  • Simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Education

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