Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in hispanic immigrants after the September 11th attacks: Severity and relationship to previous traumatic exposure

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity in Hispanic immigrants exposed to September 11th attacks through television, ascertained the relationship between previous traumatic exposure and September 11th-related symptoms, and investigated the effect of television exposure of the attacks on symptoms. A total of 110 Hispanic immigrant adults (22 males, 88 females) living more than 1,000 miles from the attacks completed measures of natural disaster exposure, war violence exposure, and September 11th-related PTSD symptoms. Of the sample, 14% self-reported September 11th-related PTSD symptoms consistent with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) diagnosis. Previous exposure to natural disasters and war violence was significantly related to September 11th-related PTSD symptomatology. Individuals with symptoms consistent with a DSM-IV PTSD diagnosis reported twice as much war violence exposure and one-and-a-half times as much natural disaster exposure as those not meeting criteria. Results are discussed regarding potential public health implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-72
Number of pages17
JournalHispanic journal of behavioral sciences
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2003

Keywords

  • Hispanic immigrants
  • Previous traumatic exposure
  • PTSD
  • September 11th
  • Terrorism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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