Posttranslational modifications within the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein which restrict virus assembly and CD4-dependent infection

S. Haggerty, M. P. Dempsey, M. I. Bukrinsky, M. Guo, Mario Stevenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Alterations in two highly conserved N-linked glycosylation sites within the gp120 envelope glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) implicated in the phenotype of a noncytopathic HIV-1 variant were introduced independently and in combination into a cytopathic, infectious HIV-1 clone by site-specific mutagenesis. Neither mutation affected the synthesis of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. However, one of the mutations restricted the ability of HIV-1 envelope to localize on the cell membrane and thus markedly impaired virus assembly. The HIV-1 assembly defect could be overcome in trans if site-specific mutants were packaged in HeLa cells constitutively producing wild-type HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. In addition to inefficient virus assembly, this mutation impaired the ability of the virus to infect CD4+ T cells, but did not affect CD4-independent infection of muscle cells. These results suggest additional functions of posttranslational modification in virus replication (i.e., envelope glycoprotein transport). Given that such modifications can restrict CD4-mediated uptake without affecting CD4-independent uptake, variations in posttranslational env processing between different HIV-1 genotypes may affect virus tropism in vivo.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)501-510
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume7
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Virus Assembly
Post Translational Protein Processing
HIV-1
Glycoproteins
Infection
Mutation
Viruses
Tropism
Virus Replication
Site-Directed Mutagenesis
Glycosylation
HeLa Cells
Muscle Cells
Clone Cells
Genotype
Cell Membrane
HIV
T-Lymphocytes
Phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Posttranslational modifications within the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein which restrict virus assembly and CD4-dependent infection. / Haggerty, S.; Dempsey, M. P.; Bukrinsky, M. I.; Guo, M.; Stevenson, Mario.

In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Vol. 7, No. 6, 01.01.1991, p. 501-510.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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