Posterior sternoclavicular joint dislocation: Case report and discussion

Nick Kuzak, Adrian Ishkanian, Riyad B. Abu-Laban

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The sternoclavicular joint is the most frequently mobilized non-axial, major joint, but is the least frequently dislocated. Most sternoclavicular dislocations are anterior. When posterior sternoclavicular joint dislocations do occur, they may present with a variety of signs and symptoms, including serious intrathoracic injuries. We discuss the case of a patient with a subacute posterior sternoclavicular dislocation who presented to the emergency department 2 months after being hit in the posterior neck. We also review the signs, symptoms and management of posterior sternoclavicular dislocation and the literature on this topic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-357
Number of pages3
JournalCanadian Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume8
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sternoclavicular Joint
Joint Dislocations
Signs and Symptoms
Hospital Emergency Service
Neck
Joints
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Dislocation
  • Sternoclavicular

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Posterior sternoclavicular joint dislocation : Case report and discussion. / Kuzak, Nick; Ishkanian, Adrian; Abu-Laban, Riyad B.

In: Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 8, No. 5, 09.2006, p. 355-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kuzak, N, Ishkanian, A & Abu-Laban, RB 2006, 'Posterior sternoclavicular joint dislocation: Case report and discussion', Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine, vol. 8, no. 5, pp. 355-357.
Kuzak, Nick ; Ishkanian, Adrian ; Abu-Laban, Riyad B. / Posterior sternoclavicular joint dislocation : Case report and discussion. In: Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 8, No. 5. pp. 355-357.
@article{14c5c743a47e47788081150b95ab60ea,
title = "Posterior sternoclavicular joint dislocation: Case report and discussion",
abstract = "The sternoclavicular joint is the most frequently mobilized non-axial, major joint, but is the least frequently dislocated. Most sternoclavicular dislocations are anterior. When posterior sternoclavicular joint dislocations do occur, they may present with a variety of signs and symptoms, including serious intrathoracic injuries. We discuss the case of a patient with a subacute posterior sternoclavicular dislocation who presented to the emergency department 2 months after being hit in the posterior neck. We also review the signs, symptoms and management of posterior sternoclavicular dislocation and the literature on this topic.",
keywords = "Dislocation, Sternoclavicular",
author = "Nick Kuzak and Adrian Ishkanian and Abu-Laban, {Riyad B.}",
year = "2006",
month = "9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "355--357",
journal = "Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine",
issn = "1481-8035",
publisher = "BC Decker Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Posterior sternoclavicular joint dislocation

T2 - Case report and discussion

AU - Kuzak, Nick

AU - Ishkanian, Adrian

AU - Abu-Laban, Riyad B.

PY - 2006/9

Y1 - 2006/9

N2 - The sternoclavicular joint is the most frequently mobilized non-axial, major joint, but is the least frequently dislocated. Most sternoclavicular dislocations are anterior. When posterior sternoclavicular joint dislocations do occur, they may present with a variety of signs and symptoms, including serious intrathoracic injuries. We discuss the case of a patient with a subacute posterior sternoclavicular dislocation who presented to the emergency department 2 months after being hit in the posterior neck. We also review the signs, symptoms and management of posterior sternoclavicular dislocation and the literature on this topic.

AB - The sternoclavicular joint is the most frequently mobilized non-axial, major joint, but is the least frequently dislocated. Most sternoclavicular dislocations are anterior. When posterior sternoclavicular joint dislocations do occur, they may present with a variety of signs and symptoms, including serious intrathoracic injuries. We discuss the case of a patient with a subacute posterior sternoclavicular dislocation who presented to the emergency department 2 months after being hit in the posterior neck. We also review the signs, symptoms and management of posterior sternoclavicular dislocation and the literature on this topic.

KW - Dislocation

KW - Sternoclavicular

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33750238955&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33750238955&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 17338849

AN - SCOPUS:33750238955

VL - 8

SP - 355

EP - 357

JO - Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine

JF - Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine

SN - 1481-8035

IS - 5

ER -