Positive and Negative Self-Conscious Emotion and Transmission Risk Following HIV Diagnosis

Abigail W. Batchelder, Adam Carrico, Michael Acree, Frederick M. Hecht, Judith Tedlie Moskowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

While negative emotions are associated with risk behaviors and risk avoidance among people with HIV, emerging evidence indicates that negative self-conscious emotions, those evoked by self-reflection or self-evaluation (e.g., shame, guilt, and embarrassment), may differentially influence health-risk behaviors by producing avoidance or, conversely, pro-social behaviors. Positive emotions are associated with beneficial health behaviors, and may account for inconsistent findings related to negative self-conscious emotions. Using multinomial logistic regression, we tested whether positive emotion moderated the relationships between negative emotion and negative self-conscious emotions and level of condomless sex risk: (1) seroconcordant; (2) serodiscordant with undetectable viral load; and (3) serodiscordant with detectable viral load [potentially amplified transmission (PAT)] among people recently diagnosed with HIV (n = 276). While positive emotion did not moderate the relationship between negative emotion and condomless sex, it did moderate the relationship between negative self-conscious emotion and PAT (AOR = 0.60; 95% CI 0.41, 0.87); high negative self-conscious and high positive emotion were associated with lower PAT risk. Acknowledgment of both positive and negative self-conscious emotion may reduce transmission risk behavior among people with HIV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1496-1502
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Emotions
HIV
Risk-Taking
Viral Load
Shame
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Guilt
Social Behavior
Health Behavior
Logistic Models
Health

Keywords

  • High-risk sex
  • HIV
  • Negative self-conscious emotion
  • Positive emotion
  • Shame

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Positive and Negative Self-Conscious Emotion and Transmission Risk Following HIV Diagnosis. / Batchelder, Abigail W.; Carrico, Adam; Acree, Michael; Hecht, Frederick M.; Moskowitz, Judith Tedlie.

In: AIDS and Behavior, Vol. 22, No. 5, 01.05.2018, p. 1496-1502.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Batchelder, Abigail W. ; Carrico, Adam ; Acree, Michael ; Hecht, Frederick M. ; Moskowitz, Judith Tedlie. / Positive and Negative Self-Conscious Emotion and Transmission Risk Following HIV Diagnosis. In: AIDS and Behavior. 2018 ; Vol. 22, No. 5. pp. 1496-1502.
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