Poor prognosis of arthritis-associated pyoderma gangrenosum

Carlos A. Charles, Tracy L. Bialy, Anna F. Falabella, William H. Eaglstein, Francisco A. Kerdel, Robert Kirsner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: The association between pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and arthritis is well established. We have observed a refractory population of patients with arthritis-associated PG (PGA). We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that differences exist in response to treatment in patients with PGA compared with patients with PG without arthritis. Observations: We performed a review of patients with PG during a 2-year period. Patients had noninfectious chronic ulcerations clinically typical for PG, exclusion of relevant differential diagnoses, and consistent histopathological features. Outcomes compared between patients with arthritis (PGA) and without arthritis (PG) included complete healing, percentage change in wound size, and duration of therapy. Of 10 PG ulcers, 7 healed, compared with 2 of 8 PGA ulcers. There was a greater mean percentage decrease in wound size in the PG vs the PGA ulcers (78.9% vs 23.4%; P = .10) and a shorter mean duration of treatment (8.7 vs 14.8 months; P = .18). Conclusions: The ulcers of patients with PGA seem more refractory to treatment than the ulcers of patients with PG alone. Those with PGA ulcers represent a refractory subset of patients, and the ulcers are possibly secondary to unique pathophysiological features.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)861-864
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Dermatology
Volume140
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2004

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Pyoderma Gangrenosum
Prostaglandins A
Arthritis
Ulcer
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics
Differential Diagnosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Charles, C. A., Bialy, T. L., Falabella, A. F., Eaglstein, W. H., Kerdel, F. A., & Kirsner, R. (2004). Poor prognosis of arthritis-associated pyoderma gangrenosum. Archives of Dermatology, 140(7), 861-864. https://doi.org/10.1001/archderm.140.7.861

Poor prognosis of arthritis-associated pyoderma gangrenosum. / Charles, Carlos A.; Bialy, Tracy L.; Falabella, Anna F.; Eaglstein, William H.; Kerdel, Francisco A.; Kirsner, Robert.

In: Archives of Dermatology, Vol. 140, No. 7, 01.07.2004, p. 861-864.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Charles, CA, Bialy, TL, Falabella, AF, Eaglstein, WH, Kerdel, FA & Kirsner, R 2004, 'Poor prognosis of arthritis-associated pyoderma gangrenosum', Archives of Dermatology, vol. 140, no. 7, pp. 861-864. https://doi.org/10.1001/archderm.140.7.861
Charles CA, Bialy TL, Falabella AF, Eaglstein WH, Kerdel FA, Kirsner R. Poor prognosis of arthritis-associated pyoderma gangrenosum. Archives of Dermatology. 2004 Jul 1;140(7):861-864. https://doi.org/10.1001/archderm.140.7.861
Charles, Carlos A. ; Bialy, Tracy L. ; Falabella, Anna F. ; Eaglstein, William H. ; Kerdel, Francisco A. ; Kirsner, Robert. / Poor prognosis of arthritis-associated pyoderma gangrenosum. In: Archives of Dermatology. 2004 ; Vol. 140, No. 7. pp. 861-864.
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