Platelet hyperreactivity in women from families with premature atherosclerosis.

Karla Kurrelmeyer, Lewis Becker, Diane Becker, Lisa Yanek, Pascal Goldschmidt-Clermont, Paul F. Bray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to determine whether sex differences in platelet function exist in families with premature atherosclerosis. Compared with men, women have a greater risk of death and recurrent events following myocardial infarction and coronary artery bypass graft surgery. The reasons for this sex discrepancy are unknown. Because blood platelets play a central role in the formation of pathologic thrombi at sites of ruptured atheromatous plaques, we postulated that sex differences in platelet function exist that may be partly responsible for the sex difference in coronary artery disease (CAD) outcomes. METHODS: We compared platelet reactivity in 400 asymptomatic men and women with family histories of premature CAD. Subjects were participants in the Johns Hopkins Sibling Study, a prospective investigation of coronary risk factors in asymptomatic, apparently healthy siblings of people with documented CAD. RESULTS: The platelets from women bound more fibrinogen in response to low and high concentrations of adenosine diphosphate. This sex difference was greater in whites than in African Americans. Age did not have an impact on these findings, although platelets from women 48 to 59 years old tended to bind less fibrinogen than those younger than 48 years. Female platelets also demonstrated greater spontaneous aggregation compared with male platelets, and women had higher levels of plasma thromboxane than men did. These differences were independent of smoking, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, or aspirin use. CONCLUSIONS: In asymptomatic individuals with family histories of premature CAD, platelets from women are more reactive than platelets from men. This observation cannot be explained by differences in cardiac risk factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)272-277
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Medical Women's Association (1972)
Volume58
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Atherosclerosis
Blood Platelets
Sex Characteristics
Coronary Artery Disease
Fibrinogen
Siblings
Safe Sex
Thromboxanes
Atherosclerotic Plaques
Hypercholesterolemia
Coronary Artery Bypass
African Americans
Adenosine Diphosphate
Aspirin
Thrombosis
Smoking
Myocardial Infarction
Prospective Studies
Hypertension
Transplants

Cite this

Kurrelmeyer, K., Becker, L., Becker, D., Yanek, L., Goldschmidt-Clermont, P., & Bray, P. F. (2003). Platelet hyperreactivity in women from families with premature atherosclerosis. Journal of the American Medical Women's Association (1972), 58(4), 272-277.

Platelet hyperreactivity in women from families with premature atherosclerosis. / Kurrelmeyer, Karla; Becker, Lewis; Becker, Diane; Yanek, Lisa; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal; Bray, Paul F.

In: Journal of the American Medical Women's Association (1972), Vol. 58, No. 4, 01.01.2003, p. 272-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kurrelmeyer, K, Becker, L, Becker, D, Yanek, L, Goldschmidt-Clermont, P & Bray, PF 2003, 'Platelet hyperreactivity in women from families with premature atherosclerosis.', Journal of the American Medical Women's Association (1972), vol. 58, no. 4, pp. 272-277.
Kurrelmeyer K, Becker L, Becker D, Yanek L, Goldschmidt-Clermont P, Bray PF. Platelet hyperreactivity in women from families with premature atherosclerosis. Journal of the American Medical Women's Association (1972). 2003 Jan 1;58(4):272-277.
Kurrelmeyer, Karla ; Becker, Lewis ; Becker, Diane ; Yanek, Lisa ; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal ; Bray, Paul F. / Platelet hyperreactivity in women from families with premature atherosclerosis. In: Journal of the American Medical Women's Association (1972). 2003 ; Vol. 58, No. 4. pp. 272-277.
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