Picosecond lasers: The next generation of short-pulsed lasers

Joshua R. Freedman, Joely Kaufman, Andrei I. Metelitsa, Jeremy B. Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Selective photothermolysis, first discussed in the context of targeted microsurgery in 1983, proposed that the optimal parameters for specific thermal damage rely critically on the duration over which energy is delivered to the tissue. At that time, nonspecific thermal damage had been an intrinsic limitation of all commercially available lasers, despite efforts to mitigate this by a variety of compensatory cooling mechanisms. Fifteen years later, experimental picosecond lasers were first reported in the dermatological literature to demonstrate greater efficacy over their nanosecond predecessors in the context of targeted destruction of tattoo ink. Within the last 4 years, more than a decade after those experiments, the first commercially available cutaneous picosecond laser unit became available (Cynosure, Westford, Massachusetts), and several pilot studies have demonstrated its utility in tattoo removal. An experimental picosecond infrared laser has also recently demonstrated a nonthermal tissue ablative capability in soft tissue, bone, and dentin. In this article, we review the published data pertaining to dermatology on picosecond lasers from their initial reports to the present as well as discuss forthcoming technology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-168
Number of pages5
JournalSeminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Lasers
Hot Temperature
Ink
Microsurgery
Dentin
Dermatology
Technology
Bone and Bones
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Picosecond lasers : The next generation of short-pulsed lasers. / Freedman, Joshua R.; Kaufman, Joely; Metelitsa, Andrei I.; Green, Jeremy B.

In: Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 33, No. 4, 2014, p. 164-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Freedman, JR, Kaufman, J, Metelitsa, AI & Green, JB 2014, 'Picosecond lasers: The next generation of short-pulsed lasers', Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 164-168. https://doi.org/10.12788/j.sder.0117
Freedman, Joshua R. ; Kaufman, Joely ; Metelitsa, Andrei I. ; Green, Jeremy B. / Picosecond lasers : The next generation of short-pulsed lasers. In: Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery. 2014 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 164-168.
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