Piano training enhances Stroop performance and musical self-efficacy in older adults with Parkinson’s disease

Jennifer A. Bugos, Teresa Lesiuk, Shafa Nathani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is commonly associated with motor symptoms; however, many patients with PD exhibit decline in executive functions. Executive functions refer to a broad array of generalized cognitive abilities such as cognitive control and working memory. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the impact of a novel intense group piano training program on executive functions in patients with PD. Forty-five patients with PD were assigned to an intense group piano training program or a waitlist control group. Group intensive piano training consisted of basic piano technique, finger dexterity exercises, basic piano repertoire, and music theory, presented over a 10-day period (30 hrs of training). Participants completed a battery of standardized cognitive measures of processing speed, cognitive control, and verbal fluency, pre- and post-training. Results of an independent samples Mann–Whitney test on composite cognitive and psychosocial variables revealed significantly enhanced Stroop performance and musical self-efficacy. Intensive piano training may serve as an effective cognitive and psychosocial intervention for those with PD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)615-630
Number of pages16
JournalPsychology of Music
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

Keywords

  • Parkinson’s disease
  • executive functions
  • music training
  • older adults
  • piano training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Music

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