Physical properties and biodegradation of lactide-based poly(ethylene glycol) polymer networks for tissue engineering

Young Min Ju, Kwang Duk Ahn, Jong Man Kim, Jeffrey A. Hubbell, Dong Keun Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

New lactide-based poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) polymer networks (GL-PEG) have been prepared by photopolymerization using two nontoxic macromers, triacrylated lactic acid oligomer emanating from a glycerol center (GL) and monoacrylated PEG. These materials may use as polymer scaffolds in tissue engineering because they provide biodegradable, cell-adhesion resistant, and ligand-immobilizable characteristics. The thermal and mechanical properties of the resulting GL-PEG networks were evaluated and their biodegradability was investigated in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 80°C. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of all networks after degradation relatively decreased and the trend was similar to those before biodegradation, whereas thermal decomposition temperature (Td1/2) increased in all networks to a certain degree. The tensile strength decreased as PEG was incorporated and as the molecular weight and content of PEG increased due to the soft PEG chains. Degradation rate of GL-PEG networks was controlled by the ratio of GL to PEG, and generally the rate of GL-PEG networks was faster than that of GL homonetworks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-114
Number of pages8
JournalPolymer Bulletin
Volume50
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

biodegradation
tissue engineering
glycerols
Biodegradation
Tissue engineering
Polyethylene glycols
glycols
Polymers
ethylene
Physical properties
physical properties
Glycerol
polymers
degradation
biodegradability
lactic acid
dilactide
oligomers
tensile strength
glass transition temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Physical properties and biodegradation of lactide-based poly(ethylene glycol) polymer networks for tissue engineering. / Ju, Young Min; Ahn, Kwang Duk; Kim, Jong Man; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Han, Dong Keun.

In: Polymer Bulletin, Vol. 50, No. 1-2, 01.04.2003, p. 107-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ju, Young Min ; Ahn, Kwang Duk ; Kim, Jong Man ; Hubbell, Jeffrey A. ; Han, Dong Keun. / Physical properties and biodegradation of lactide-based poly(ethylene glycol) polymer networks for tissue engineering. In: Polymer Bulletin. 2003 ; Vol. 50, No. 1-2. pp. 107-114.
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