Physical activity and cognition in the northern Manhattan study

Joshua Z. Willey, Yeseon Park Moon, Rachel Ruder, Yuen K. Cheung, Ralph L Sacco, Mitchell S V Elkind, Clinton B Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: To test the hypothesis that leisure time physical activity (PA) is associated with cognitive status. Methods: We assessed cognition using the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) at enrollment and using the modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS-m) administered annually since 2001 in the Northern Manhattan Study. Baseline measures of leisure time PA were collected via in-person questionnaires. Total PA was categorized into 3 groups based on the metabolic equivalent (MET) score, a composite of total reported intensity and time. We used linear regression models to examine the association of PA with MMSE, and generalized estimating equations for change in TICS-m over time. Results: There were 3,298 stroke-free participants with MMSE data (mean MMSE 26.0 ± 3.8) and 2,279 with TICS-m scores available. Compared to no PA, those with the upper quartile of MET scores had greater baseline MMSE scores (adjusted β = 0.4, p = 0.01) but no association with change in TICS-m over time. There were interactions (p < 0.05) between PA and both insurance and education; compared to no PA, those in the upper quartile of MET scores had a greater MMSE score only among those with Medicaid/no insurance (adjusted β = 0.83, p = 0.0005) and those who did not complete high school (adjusted β = 0.68, p = 0.001). Conclusions: Increased levels of PA were associated with better baseline MMSE, particularly among those with socioeconomic disadvantages, but not with cognitive decline.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-106
Number of pages7
JournalNeuroepidemiology
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

Fingerprint

Cognition
Metabolic Equivalent
Leisure Activities
Insurance
Linear Models
Medicaid
Stroke
Interviews
Education

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Dementia
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Willey, J. Z., Moon, Y. P., Ruder, R., Cheung, Y. K., Sacco, R. L., Elkind, M. S. V., & Wright, C. B. (2014). Physical activity and cognition in the northern Manhattan study. Neuroepidemiology, 42(2), 100-106. https://doi.org/10.1159/000355975

Physical activity and cognition in the northern Manhattan study. / Willey, Joshua Z.; Moon, Yeseon Park; Ruder, Rachel; Cheung, Yuen K.; Sacco, Ralph L; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Wright, Clinton B.

In: Neuroepidemiology, Vol. 42, No. 2, 01.02.2014, p. 100-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Willey, JZ, Moon, YP, Ruder, R, Cheung, YK, Sacco, RL, Elkind, MSV & Wright, CB 2014, 'Physical activity and cognition in the northern Manhattan study', Neuroepidemiology, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 100-106. https://doi.org/10.1159/000355975
Willey JZ, Moon YP, Ruder R, Cheung YK, Sacco RL, Elkind MSV et al. Physical activity and cognition in the northern Manhattan study. Neuroepidemiology. 2014 Feb 1;42(2):100-106. https://doi.org/10.1159/000355975
Willey, Joshua Z. ; Moon, Yeseon Park ; Ruder, Rachel ; Cheung, Yuen K. ; Sacco, Ralph L ; Elkind, Mitchell S V ; Wright, Clinton B. / Physical activity and cognition in the northern Manhattan study. In: Neuroepidemiology. 2014 ; Vol. 42, No. 2. pp. 100-106.
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