Pharmacokinetics of didanosine in antepartum and postpartum human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnant women and their neonates: An AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study

Yi Wang, Elizabeth Livingston, Shivakumar Patil, Ross E. McKinney, Arlene D. Bardeguez, Jorge Gandia, Mary J. O'Sullivan, Pamela Clax, Sharon Huang, Jashvant D. Unadkat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Didanosine (ddI) pharmacokinetics in antepartum and postpartum human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women and their neonates were studied. HIV-infected pregnant women received an intravenous (iv) ddI infusion (1.6 mg/kg/h) or an oral dose (200 mg bid or 125 mg bid) at 31 weeks antepartum and 6 weeks postpartum. Blood samples were obtained regularly up to 6 or 8 h after drug administration. The same oral dose of ddI (bid) was administered until labor began. Then, ddI was infused iv until delivery. An oral pharmacokinetic study (60 mg/m2) was conducted in infants at day 1 and at week 6 after birth. Plasma concentrations of ddI were measured by radioimmunoassay. After iv ddI administration, only the maternal plasma clearance was found to be significantly increased antepartum (1028 ± 231 mL/min) versus postpartum (707 ± 213 mL/min). No pharmacokinetic parameters after oral administration were significantly affected by pregnancy. The pharmacokinetics of ddI in the neonates were highly variable. We conclude that the oral ddI dose need not be adjusted during pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1536-1541
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume180
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 9 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Didanosine
Postpartum Period
Pregnant Women
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Pharmacokinetics
Clinical Trials
HIV
Newborn Infant
Pregnancy
Intravenous Infusions
Intravenous Administration
Radioimmunoassay
Oral Administration
Mothers
Parturition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Pharmacokinetics of didanosine in antepartum and postpartum human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnant women and their neonates : An AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study. / Wang, Yi; Livingston, Elizabeth; Patil, Shivakumar; McKinney, Ross E.; Bardeguez, Arlene D.; Gandia, Jorge; O'Sullivan, Mary J.; Clax, Pamela; Huang, Sharon; Unadkat, Jashvant D.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 180, No. 5, 09.11.1999, p. 1536-1541.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Y, Livingston, E, Patil, S, McKinney, RE, Bardeguez, AD, Gandia, J, O'Sullivan, MJ, Clax, P, Huang, S & Unadkat, JD 1999, 'Pharmacokinetics of didanosine in antepartum and postpartum human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnant women and their neonates: An AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 180, no. 5, pp. 1536-1541. https://doi.org/10.1086/315067
Wang, Yi ; Livingston, Elizabeth ; Patil, Shivakumar ; McKinney, Ross E. ; Bardeguez, Arlene D. ; Gandia, Jorge ; O'Sullivan, Mary J. ; Clax, Pamela ; Huang, Sharon ; Unadkat, Jashvant D. / Pharmacokinetics of didanosine in antepartum and postpartum human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnant women and their neonates : An AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1999 ; Vol. 180, No. 5. pp. 1536-1541.
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