Pesticide exposure and risk of Parkinson's disease: A family-based case-control study

Dana B. Hancock, Eden R Martin, Gregory M. Mayhew, Jeffrey M. Stajich, Rita Jewett, Mark A. Stacy, Burton L. Scott, Jeffery M Vance, William K Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

164 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Pesticides and correlated lifestyle factors (e.g., exposure to well-water and farming) are repeatedly reported risk factors for Parkinson's disease (PD), but few family-based studies have examined these relationships. Methods: Using 319 cases and 296 relative and other controls, associations of direct pesticide application, well-water consumption, and farming residences/occupations with PD were examined using generalized estimating equations while controlling for age-at-examination, sex, cigarette smoking, and caffeine consumption. Results: Overall, individuals with PD were significantly more likely to report direct pesticide application than their unaffected relatives (odds ratio = 1.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-2.29). Frequency, duration, and cumulative exposure were also significantly associated with PD in a dose-response pattern (p ≤ 0.013). Associations of direct pesticide application did not vary by sex but were modified by family history of PD, as significant associations were restricted to individuals with no family history. When classifying pesticides by functional type, both insecticides and herbicides were found to significantly increase risk of PD. Two specific insecticide classes, organochlorines and organophosphorus compounds, were significantly associated with PD. Consuming well-water and living/working on a farm were not associated with PD. Conclusion: These data corroborate positive associations of broadly defined pesticide exposure with PD in families, particularly for sporadic PD. These data also implicate a few specific classes of pesticides in PD and thus emphasize the need to consider a more narrow definition of pesticides in future studies.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6
JournalBMC Neurology
Volume8
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 28 2008

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Pesticides
Parkinson Disease
Case-Control Studies
Insecticides
Agriculture
Odds Ratio
Organophosphorus Compounds
Chlorinated Hydrocarbons
Water
Herbicides
Caffeine
Occupations
Drinking
Life Style
Smoking
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Pesticide exposure and risk of Parkinson's disease : A family-based case-control study. / Hancock, Dana B.; Martin, Eden R; Mayhew, Gregory M.; Stajich, Jeffrey M.; Jewett, Rita; Stacy, Mark A.; Scott, Burton L.; Vance, Jeffery M; Scott, William K.

In: BMC Neurology, Vol. 8, 6, 28.03.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hancock, Dana B. ; Martin, Eden R ; Mayhew, Gregory M. ; Stajich, Jeffrey M. ; Jewett, Rita ; Stacy, Mark A. ; Scott, Burton L. ; Vance, Jeffery M ; Scott, William K. / Pesticide exposure and risk of Parkinson's disease : A family-based case-control study. In: BMC Neurology. 2008 ; Vol. 8.
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