Personal Identity Development in Hispanic Immigrant Adolescents: Links with Positive Psychosocial Functioning, Depressive Symptoms, and Externalizing Problems

Seth J Schwartz, Jennifer B. Unger, Alan Meca, Elma I. Lorenzo-Blanco, Lourdes Baezconde-Garbanati, Miguel Ángel Cano, Brandy Piña-Watson, Jose Szapocznik, Byron L. Zamboanga, David Córdova, Andrea J. Romero, Tae Kyoung Lee, Daniel W. Soto, Juan A. Villamar, Karina M. Lizzi, Sabrina E. des Rosiers, Monica Pattarroyo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study was designed to examine trajectories of personal identity coherence and confusion among Hispanic recent-immigrant adolescents, as well as the effects of these trajectories on psychosocial and risk-taking outcomes. Personal identity is extremely important in anchoring young immigrants during a time of acute cultural change. A sample of 302 recently immigrated (5 years or less in the United States at baseline) Hispanic adolescents (Mage = 14.51 years at baseline; SD = 0.88 years, range 14–17) from Miami and Los Angeles (47 % girls) completed measures of personal identity coherence and confusion at the first five waves of a six-wave longitudinal study; and reported on positive psychosocial functioning, depressive symptoms, and externalizing problems at baseline and at Time 6. Results indicated that identity coherence increased linearly across time, but that there were no significant changes in confusion over time and no individual differences in confusion trajectories. Higher baseline levels of, and improvements in, coherence predicted higher levels of self-esteem, optimism, and prosocial behavior at the final study timepoint. Higher baseline levels of confusion predicted lower self-esteem, greater depressive symptoms, more aggressive behavior, and more rule breaking at the final study timepoint. These results are discussed in terms of the importance of personal identity for Hispanic immigrant adolescents, and in terms of implications for intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 23 2016

Fingerprint

Confusion
Hispanic Americans
immigrant
Depression
adolescent
Self Concept
self-esteem
Los Angeles
Risk-Taking
Individuality
aggressive behavior
Longitudinal Studies
cultural change
optimism
longitudinal study
time
coherence

Keywords

  • Depressive symptoms
  • Hispanic
  • Identity and externalizing behavior problems
  • Immigrant
  • Personal identity
  • Self-esteem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Personal Identity Development in Hispanic Immigrant Adolescents : Links with Positive Psychosocial Functioning, Depressive Symptoms, and Externalizing Problems. / Schwartz, Seth J; Unger, Jennifer B.; Meca, Alan; Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Cano, Miguel Ángel; Piña-Watson, Brandy; Szapocznik, Jose; Zamboanga, Byron L.; Córdova, David; Romero, Andrea J.; Lee, Tae Kyoung; Soto, Daniel W.; Villamar, Juan A.; Lizzi, Karina M.; des Rosiers, Sabrina E.; Pattarroyo, Monica.

In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 23.11.2016, p. 1-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schwartz, SJ, Unger, JB, Meca, A, Lorenzo-Blanco, EI, Baezconde-Garbanati, L, Cano, MÁ, Piña-Watson, B, Szapocznik, J, Zamboanga, BL, Córdova, D, Romero, AJ, Lee, TK, Soto, DW, Villamar, JA, Lizzi, KM, des Rosiers, SE & Pattarroyo, M 2016, 'Personal Identity Development in Hispanic Immigrant Adolescents: Links with Positive Psychosocial Functioning, Depressive Symptoms, and Externalizing Problems' Journal of Youth and Adolescence, pp. 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-016-0615-y
Schwartz, Seth J ; Unger, Jennifer B. ; Meca, Alan ; Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I. ; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes ; Cano, Miguel Ángel ; Piña-Watson, Brandy ; Szapocznik, Jose ; Zamboanga, Byron L. ; Córdova, David ; Romero, Andrea J. ; Lee, Tae Kyoung ; Soto, Daniel W. ; Villamar, Juan A. ; Lizzi, Karina M. ; des Rosiers, Sabrina E. ; Pattarroyo, Monica. / Personal Identity Development in Hispanic Immigrant Adolescents : Links with Positive Psychosocial Functioning, Depressive Symptoms, and Externalizing Problems. In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence. 2016 ; pp. 1-16.
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