Peritoneal drainage is associated with higher survival rates for necrotizing enterocolitis in premature, extremely low birth weight infants

Jun Tashiro, Amy E. Wagenaar, Eduardo Perez, Juan E Sola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background To evaluate peritoneal drainage (PD) and laparotomy ± resection/ostomy (LAP) as initial approaches to the surgical management of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in premature, extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. Methods Kids' Inpatient Database (2003-2012) was searched for cases of NEC (International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] 777.5x) in premature (<37 weeks), extremely low birth weight (<1000 g) infants. Infants were admitted at <28 days of life. Propensity score (PS)-matched analyses were performed, using end points of hospital mortality, length of stay (LOS), and cost of hospitalization. Cases were matched 1:1 on 48 confounding variables (demographic, clinical, and hospital characteristics and 39 comorbidities). Results On PS-matched comparison, PD had higher survival versus LAP, P = 0.0009. LOS and cost were higher for PD versus LAP, P < 0.003. Survival rates did not differ between PD + LAP and PD-only treatments. LOS and cost were higher for PD + LAP versus PD-only, P < 0.02. PD + LAP infants had higher survival versus LAP, P = 0.0193. LOS and cost were higher for PD + LAP, P < 0.005. Conclusions A risk-adjusted PS-matched analysis of operative management in premature, ELBW infants with NEC found higher survival rates associated with PD placement versus LAP, whether PD was used as definitive treatment or with subsequent LAP even after controlling for potential contributors to selection bias (i.e., stability influencing management preference).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)132-138
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume218
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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Extremely Low Birth Weight Infant
Necrotizing Enterocolitis
Drainage
Survival Rate
Propensity Score
Length of Stay
Costs and Cost Analysis
International Classification of Diseases
Ostomy
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Selection Bias
Low Birth Weight Infant
Hospital Mortality
Laparotomy
Comorbidity
Inpatients
Hospitalization

Keywords

  • Necrotizing enterocolitis
  • Neonatal prematurity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

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title = "Peritoneal drainage is associated with higher survival rates for necrotizing enterocolitis in premature, extremely low birth weight infants",
abstract = "Background To evaluate peritoneal drainage (PD) and laparotomy ± resection/ostomy (LAP) as initial approaches to the surgical management of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in premature, extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. Methods Kids' Inpatient Database (2003-2012) was searched for cases of NEC (International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] 777.5x) in premature (<37 weeks), extremely low birth weight (<1000 g) infants. Infants were admitted at <28 days of life. Propensity score (PS)-matched analyses were performed, using end points of hospital mortality, length of stay (LOS), and cost of hospitalization. Cases were matched 1:1 on 48 confounding variables (demographic, clinical, and hospital characteristics and 39 comorbidities). Results On PS-matched comparison, PD had higher survival versus LAP, P = 0.0009. LOS and cost were higher for PD versus LAP, P < 0.003. Survival rates did not differ between PD + LAP and PD-only treatments. LOS and cost were higher for PD + LAP versus PD-only, P < 0.02. PD + LAP infants had higher survival versus LAP, P = 0.0193. LOS and cost were higher for PD + LAP, P < 0.005. Conclusions A risk-adjusted PS-matched analysis of operative management in premature, ELBW infants with NEC found higher survival rates associated with PD placement versus LAP, whether PD was used as definitive treatment or with subsequent LAP even after controlling for potential contributors to selection bias (i.e., stability influencing management preference).",
keywords = "Necrotizing enterocolitis, Neonatal prematurity",
author = "Jun Tashiro and Wagenaar, {Amy E.} and Eduardo Perez and Sola, {Juan E}",
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language = "English (US)",
volume = "218",
pages = "132--138",
journal = "Journal of Surgical Research",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Peritoneal drainage is associated with higher survival rates for necrotizing enterocolitis in premature, extremely low birth weight infants

AU - Tashiro, Jun

AU - Wagenaar, Amy E.

AU - Perez, Eduardo

AU - Sola, Juan E

PY - 2017/10/1

Y1 - 2017/10/1

N2 - Background To evaluate peritoneal drainage (PD) and laparotomy ± resection/ostomy (LAP) as initial approaches to the surgical management of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in premature, extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. Methods Kids' Inpatient Database (2003-2012) was searched for cases of NEC (International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] 777.5x) in premature (<37 weeks), extremely low birth weight (<1000 g) infants. Infants were admitted at <28 days of life. Propensity score (PS)-matched analyses were performed, using end points of hospital mortality, length of stay (LOS), and cost of hospitalization. Cases were matched 1:1 on 48 confounding variables (demographic, clinical, and hospital characteristics and 39 comorbidities). Results On PS-matched comparison, PD had higher survival versus LAP, P = 0.0009. LOS and cost were higher for PD versus LAP, P < 0.003. Survival rates did not differ between PD + LAP and PD-only treatments. LOS and cost were higher for PD + LAP versus PD-only, P < 0.02. PD + LAP infants had higher survival versus LAP, P = 0.0193. LOS and cost were higher for PD + LAP, P < 0.005. Conclusions A risk-adjusted PS-matched analysis of operative management in premature, ELBW infants with NEC found higher survival rates associated with PD placement versus LAP, whether PD was used as definitive treatment or with subsequent LAP even after controlling for potential contributors to selection bias (i.e., stability influencing management preference).

AB - Background To evaluate peritoneal drainage (PD) and laparotomy ± resection/ostomy (LAP) as initial approaches to the surgical management of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in premature, extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. Methods Kids' Inpatient Database (2003-2012) was searched for cases of NEC (International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] 777.5x) in premature (<37 weeks), extremely low birth weight (<1000 g) infants. Infants were admitted at <28 days of life. Propensity score (PS)-matched analyses were performed, using end points of hospital mortality, length of stay (LOS), and cost of hospitalization. Cases were matched 1:1 on 48 confounding variables (demographic, clinical, and hospital characteristics and 39 comorbidities). Results On PS-matched comparison, PD had higher survival versus LAP, P = 0.0009. LOS and cost were higher for PD versus LAP, P < 0.003. Survival rates did not differ between PD + LAP and PD-only treatments. LOS and cost were higher for PD + LAP versus PD-only, P < 0.02. PD + LAP infants had higher survival versus LAP, P = 0.0193. LOS and cost were higher for PD + LAP, P < 0.005. Conclusions A risk-adjusted PS-matched analysis of operative management in premature, ELBW infants with NEC found higher survival rates associated with PD placement versus LAP, whether PD was used as definitive treatment or with subsequent LAP even after controlling for potential contributors to selection bias (i.e., stability influencing management preference).

KW - Necrotizing enterocolitis

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