Percutaneous Retrieval of IVC Filters With Struts Penetrating the Vertebral Body

Prasoon P. Mohan, Andrew J. Richardson, Jason Salsamendi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Inferior vena cava (IVC) filter penetration of the caval wall is a well-documented complication. Less frequently, the struts of an IVC filter can penetrate a vertebral body that can lead to symptoms of abdominal pain. Vertebral penetration poses a management challenge, and characteristics for successful endovascular retrieval of such filters has not been reported. Case Description: We present 2 cases of IVC filters with vertebral body penetration that were successfully retrieved through an endovascular approach. On preprocedure computed tomography, both patients had a small zone of osteolysis surrounding the penetrated struts into the vertebral body. The procedures were done via right internal jugular access using an Ensnare device. In one of the cases, the hangman technique was used to release the filter apex from the vessel wall. Both filters were able to be retrieved without using excessive force, follow-up venacavograms showed no sign of extravasation, and no postprocedure complications developed. Discussion: Preprocedure CT imaging is essential prior to IVC filter removal if vertebral penetration is suspected. The zone of osteolysis seen around the struts in both cases are likely the result of constant cardiorespiratory motion of the filter. Based on the fact that in both cases the filter legs were able to be disengaged from the vertebral body without the use of excessive force, we hypothesize that if a zone of osteolysis surrounding the struts can be confirmed on preprocedural CT, the filter removal can be safely attempted by the standard percutaneous endovascular approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalVascular and Endovascular Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Vena Cava Filters
Osteolysis
Venae Cavae
Abdominal Pain
Leg
Neck
Tomography
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • IVC
  • vena cava filters
  • vertebral body

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Percutaneous Retrieval of IVC Filters With Struts Penetrating the Vertebral Body. / Mohan, Prasoon P.; Richardson, Andrew J.; Salsamendi, Jason.

In: Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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