Percutaneous image-guided radiofrequency ablation in the therapeutic management of hepatocellular carcinoma

Riccardo Lencioni, C. Della Pina, C. Bartolozzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Owing to surveillance programs for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with cirrhosis, more tumors are being detected at an early, asymptomatic stage. Percutaneous ablation is considered the best treatment option for patients with Child-Pugh class A or B cirrhosis and a single, nodular-type HCC smaller than 5 cm or as many as three HCC lesions, each smaller than 3 cm, when surgical resection or liver transplantation is not suitable. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as the most powerful method for percutaneous treatment of early-stage HCC. Recent studies have shown that RFA can achieve more effective local tumor control than ethanol injection and with fewer treatment sessions. In a randomized trial, local recurrence-free survival rates were significantly higher in patients who received RFA than in those treated by ethanol injection, and treatment allocation was confirmed as an independent prognostic factor by multivariate analysis. Due to advances in radiofrequency technology, RFA also has been used to treat patients with more advanced tumors. Preliminary reports have shown that RFA performed after balloon catheter occlusion of the hepatic artery, transarterial embolization, or chemoembolization results in increased volumes of coagulation necrosis, thus enabling successful destruction of large HCC lesions. This report reviews the current status of percutaneous, image-guided RFA in the therapeutic management of HCC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-408
Number of pages8
JournalAbdominal Imaging
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Fibrosis
Ethanol
Therapeutics
Balloon Occlusion
Neoplasms
Injections
Hepatic Artery
Liver Transplantation
Statistical Factor Analysis
Necrosis
Multivariate Analysis
Catheters
Survival Rate
Technology
Recurrence

Keywords

  • Liver neoplasms, therapy
  • Liver, interventional procedure
  • Radiofrequency ablation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Urology
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Percutaneous image-guided radiofrequency ablation in the therapeutic management of hepatocellular carcinoma. / Lencioni, Riccardo; Della Pina, C.; Bartolozzi, C.

In: Abdominal Imaging, Vol. 30, No. 4, 08.2005, p. 401-408.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lencioni, Riccardo ; Della Pina, C. ; Bartolozzi, C. / Percutaneous image-guided radiofrequency ablation in the therapeutic management of hepatocellular carcinoma. In: Abdominal Imaging. 2005 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 401-408.
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