Percutaneous and open iliac screw safety and accuracy using a tactile technique with adjunctive anteroposterior fluoroscopy

Stephen G. George, Nathan H Lebwohl, Giulio Pasquotti, Seth K. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Context: All currently described percutaneous iliac screw placement methods are entirely dependent on fluoroscopy. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and the accuracy of percutaneous and open iliac screw placement using a primarily tactile technique with adjunctive anteroposterior (AP) fluoroscopy. Study Design/Context: All patients who underwent open and percutaneous iliac screw placement over a 5-year period were identified. Charts were reviewed to assess for any instances of neurologic or vascular injury associated with iliac screw placement. Screw accuracy was judged with postoperative computed tomography (CT) scans. Patient Sample: A total of 133 patients were identified who underwent open or percutaneous iliac screw placement. Computed tomography scans were available for 57 patients, and all of these patients were included in the study, with a total of 115 iliac screws. Outcome Measures: Radiographic measurements were performed, consisting of the distance of the iliac screw to the sciatic notch on postoperative radiographs and CT scans. Computed tomography scans were used to determine iliac screw accuracy. Methods: Charts were reviewed to assess for any neurologic or vascular injuries related to screw placement. The distance of the iliac screw to the sciatic notch was measured and compared on AP radiography and CT scans. Computed tomography scans were assessed for any screw violation of the iliac cortex or the sciatic notch. The accuracy of open iliac screw placement was compared with minimally invasive percutaneous placement. Results: There were no neurologic or vascular injuries related to screw placement in the 133 patients. Computed tomography scans were available for 115 iliac screws, with 3 cortical breaches, all by less than 2 mm. All 112 other screws were accurately intraosseous. There was a strong correlation between the iliac screw to the sciatic notch distance when measured by CT scan compared with AP radiography (r=0.9), thus validating the accuracy of AP fluoroscopy in guiding iliac screw placement with respect to the sciatic notch. Iliac screw accuracy was equal with the open and percutaneous insertion techniques. Conclusions: The described surgical technique represents a safe and reliable surgical option for iliac screw placement. Intraoperative AP fluoroscopy accurately reflects the distance of the iliac screw to the sciatic notch. Percutaneous iliac screws placed with this technique are as accurate as open iliac screws.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1570-1577
Number of pages8
JournalSpine Journal
Volume18
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Keywords

  • Iliac bolt
  • Iliac fixation
  • Iliac screw
  • Lumbar spinal instrumentation
  • Lumbosacral fusion
  • Minimally invasive iliac screws
  • Percutaneous iliac screws
  • Percutaneous spinal instrumentation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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