Perceived racial/ethnic discrimination and antisocial behaviors among Asian American college students: Testing the moderating roles of ethnic and American identity

Irene J K Park, Seth J Schwartz, Richard M. Lee, May Kim, Liliana Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study tested the moderating roles of ethnic identity and American identity on the association between perceived racial/ethnic discrimination and antisocial behaviors among Asian American college students. Using data from the Multi-Site University Study of Identity and Culture (MUSIC) collaborative, the sample included 1,362 East Asian and South Asian American college students. Perceived discrimination was significantly associated with antisocial behaviors for both East Asians and South Asians. Ethnic identity was not a significant moderator of the discrimination-antisocial behavior link, but American identity exacerbated the association between perceived discrimination and antisocial behaviors for both East Asians and South Asians. Interestingly, the explanatory power of the regression model was greater for South Asians than for East Asians in predicting antisocial behaviors. The importance of attending to American identity as a potential source of risk for Asian American college students exposed to racial/ethnic discrimination is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)166-176
Number of pages11
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013

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Racism
Asian Americans
discrimination
Students
student
ethnic identity
moderator
regression

Keywords

  • American identity
  • Antisocial behaviors
  • Asian American college students
  • Ethnic identity
  • Perceived racial/ethnic discrimination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Perceived racial/ethnic discrimination and antisocial behaviors among Asian American college students : Testing the moderating roles of ethnic and American identity. / Park, Irene J K; Schwartz, Seth J; Lee, Richard M.; Kim, May; Rodriguez, Liliana.

In: Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.04.2013, p. 166-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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