Perceived Discrimination and Well-Being Among Unauthorized Hispanic Immigrants: The Moderating Role of Ethnic/Racial Group Identity Centrality

Cory L. Cobb, Alan Meca, Nyla R. Branscombe, Seth J Schwartz, Dong Xie, Maria Cecilia Zea, Cristina A. Fernandez, Gardiner L. Sanders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: We investigated the association between perceived ethnic discrimination with psychological well-being and life satisfaction among a community sample of unauthorized Hispanic immigrants in the United States. We also assessed whether ethnic/racial group identity centrality moderated this relationship. Method: A community sample of self-reported unauthorized Hispanics (N = 140) completed questionnaires assessing perceived ethnic discrimination, ethnic/racial group identity centrality, psychological well-being, and life satisfaction. Results: Discrimination negatively predicted psychological well-being and life satisfaction, and ethnic/racial group identity centrality moderated these relationships. High ethnic/racial group identity centrality reduced the association of discrimination with psychological well-being and life satisfaction. Ethnic/racial identity centrality lent psychological protection for those who reported higher levels of discrimination. Conclusion: Ethnic discrimination is a salient stressor for unauthorized Hispanic immigrants. Yet high ethnic/racial group identity centrality may protect these individuals from the negative effects of discrimination by providing a sense of belonging, acceptance, and social support in the face of rejection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
discrimination
well-being
immigrant
Psychology
Group
Racism
Social Support
Undocumented Immigrants
community
social support
acceptance
questionnaire

Keywords

  • Discrimination
  • Flourishing
  • Identity centrality
  • Psychological well-being
  • Unauthorized Hispanics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Perceived Discrimination and Well-Being Among Unauthorized Hispanic Immigrants : The Moderating Role of Ethnic/Racial Group Identity Centrality. / Cobb, Cory L.; Meca, Alan; Branscombe, Nyla R.; Schwartz, Seth J; Xie, Dong; Zea, Maria Cecilia; Fernandez, Cristina A.; Sanders, Gardiner L.

In: Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cobb, Cory L. ; Meca, Alan ; Branscombe, Nyla R. ; Schwartz, Seth J ; Xie, Dong ; Zea, Maria Cecilia ; Fernandez, Cristina A. ; Sanders, Gardiner L. / Perceived Discrimination and Well-Being Among Unauthorized Hispanic Immigrants : The Moderating Role of Ethnic/Racial Group Identity Centrality. In: Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology. 2018.
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