Peer support and interpersonal psychotherapy groups experienced decreased prenatal depression, anxiety and cortisol

Tiffany Field, Miguel Diego, Jeannette Delgado, Lissette Medina

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Forty-four prenatally depressed women were randomly assigned to peer support or interpersonal psychotherapy groups at 22. weeks gestation. The peer support group participated in a 20-minute group session once per week for 12. weeks, and the interpersonal psychotherapy group met for one hour per week for 12. weeks. Assessments were conducted before and after the sessions at 22 and 34. weeks gestation. Despite the peer support group having lower socioeconomic status and higher depression scores at the beginning of the treatment period and having shorter group sessions, both groups had lower summary depression (CES-D) scores and lower anxiety (STAI) scores by the end of the treatment period. In addition, cortisol levels decreased for both groups after the last day session, although the decrease was greater for the peer support group. The groups did not differ on neonatal outcomes including gestational age and birthweight. These data suggest that peer support group sessions may be a cost-effective form of treatment for prenatal depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)621-624
Number of pages4
JournalEarly Human Development
Volume89
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Cortisol
  • Prenatal depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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