Peer crowd affiliation and internalizing distress in childhood and adolescence

A longitudinal follow-back study

Mitchell J. Prinstein, Annette M La Greca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Concurrent and longitudinal associations between peer crowd affiliation and internalized distress were examined in a sample of 246 youth (148 girls, 98 boys). Children completed measures of depression, social anxiety, loneliness, and self-esteem when they were in grades 4 to 6 (Time 1), and again 6 years later during adolescence (grades 10-12; Time 2). At Time 2, adolescents also reported their self-concept and their identification with reputation-based peer crowds, including Populars, Jocks, Brains, Burnouts, Non-Conformists, and None/Average crowds. Results indicated that adolescents' report of peer crowd affiliation was concurrently associated with self-concept and levels of internalizing distress. Follow-back analyses of internalizing trajectories revealed that Populars/Jocks had experienced significant declines in internalizing distress across development, whereas Brains exhibited some increases in internalizing distress between childhood and adolescence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)325-351
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume12
Issue number3
StatePublished - Nov 26 2002
Externally publishedYes

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adolescence
childhood
self-concept
Self Concept
brain
school grade
adolescent
reputation
self-esteem
Loneliness
anxiety
Brain
Anxiety
time
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Peer crowd affiliation and internalizing distress in childhood and adolescence : A longitudinal follow-back study. / Prinstein, Mitchell J.; La Greca, Annette M.

In: Journal of Research on Adolescence, Vol. 12, No. 3, 26.11.2002, p. 325-351.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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