Pediatric residency education: Is sports medicine getting its fair share?

Rebecca A. Demorest, David T. Bernhardt, Thomas Best, Gregory L. Landry

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction. Sports are the leading injury-related cause for pediatric primary care visits. Pediatric residency education guidelines suggest incorporating sports medicine (SM) education into curricula; however, research is lacking regarding effective teaching methods. Objective. To assess reported US pediatric residency SM curricula, teaching methods, and resident evaluation of SM education. Design/Methods. Chief residents (CRs) and third-year residents (PL3s) from 100 randomly selected US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency programs, stratified by size and geographic location, received surveys regarding programs' SM curriculum and teaching methods and individuals' methods for learning SM. Results. Response rates were 63% and 39% for CRs and PL3s, respectively. According to CRs, 34% of programs had no one in charge of their SM curriculum. Lecture (77%) was the primary method used for teaching SM. Hands-on teaching (37%) was used less frequently. CRs stated that 29% of programs did not include musculoskeletal examination teaching in their curriculums; 24% did not include formal teaching of concussion management, and 29% did not include reasons for medical disqualification. PL3s rated teaching of joint examinations and the preparticipation physical as the most poorly taught components of the physical examination. PL3s rated hands-on teaching and patient experience as the best methods for improving SM education. CRs reported that only 36% of programs have discussed incorporating more SM into their curriculum. Conclusions. SM education is deficient in US pediatric residency programs. Standardized curricula should be developed with a focus on hands-on training as a means for teaching SM to pediatric residents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-33
Number of pages6
JournalPediatrics
Volume115
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sports Medicine
Internship and Residency
Teaching
Pediatrics
Education
Curriculum
Physical Examination
Graduate Medical Education
Geographic Locations
Athletic Injuries
Accreditation
Primary Health Care
Joints
Learning
Guidelines

Keywords

  • Graduate medical education
  • Musculoskeletal
  • Orthopedics
  • Pediatric residency education
  • Sports medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Pediatric residency education : Is sports medicine getting its fair share? / Demorest, Rebecca A.; Bernhardt, David T.; Best, Thomas; Landry, Gregory L.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 115, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 28-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Demorest, Rebecca A. ; Bernhardt, David T. ; Best, Thomas ; Landry, Gregory L. / Pediatric residency education : Is sports medicine getting its fair share?. In: Pediatrics. 2005 ; Vol. 115, No. 1. pp. 28-33.
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abstract = "Introduction. Sports are the leading injury-related cause for pediatric primary care visits. Pediatric residency education guidelines suggest incorporating sports medicine (SM) education into curricula; however, research is lacking regarding effective teaching methods. Objective. To assess reported US pediatric residency SM curricula, teaching methods, and resident evaluation of SM education. Design/Methods. Chief residents (CRs) and third-year residents (PL3s) from 100 randomly selected US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency programs, stratified by size and geographic location, received surveys regarding programs' SM curriculum and teaching methods and individuals' methods for learning SM. Results. Response rates were 63{\%} and 39{\%} for CRs and PL3s, respectively. According to CRs, 34{\%} of programs had no one in charge of their SM curriculum. Lecture (77{\%}) was the primary method used for teaching SM. Hands-on teaching (37{\%}) was used less frequently. CRs stated that 29{\%} of programs did not include musculoskeletal examination teaching in their curriculums; 24{\%} did not include formal teaching of concussion management, and 29{\%} did not include reasons for medical disqualification. PL3s rated teaching of joint examinations and the preparticipation physical as the most poorly taught components of the physical examination. PL3s rated hands-on teaching and patient experience as the best methods for improving SM education. CRs reported that only 36{\%} of programs have discussed incorporating more SM into their curriculum. Conclusions. SM education is deficient in US pediatric residency programs. Standardized curricula should be developed with a focus on hands-on training as a means for teaching SM to pediatric residents.",
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