Patterns and predictors of paternal involvement in early adolescents' type 1 diabetes management over 3 years

Marisa E. Hilliard, Jennifer M. Rohan, Joseph R. Rausch, Alan M Delamater, Jennifer Shroff Pendley, Dennis Drotar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To document trajectories of paternal involvement in diabetes management and examine bidirectional associations with diabetes outcomes across early adolescence. Methods 3-year prospective assessment of paternal involvement, diabetes self-management, and glycemic control among 136 youth (age 9-12 at baseline) and their mothers and fathers. Results Unconditional growth curves demonstrated decreasing amount (maternal report: F(1,128) = 14.79; paternal report: F(1,111) = 12.95, ps < 0.01) and level of contribution (maternal report: F(1,131) = 23.6, p <. 01) of paternal involvement. Controlling for covariates, lower youth self-management predicted an increasing slope in fathers' self-reported amount of involvement (b = -0.15 to -0.22, p <. 05), and higher levels of fathers' self-reported level of contribution predicted a decreasing slope in youths' self-reported self-management (b = -0.01, p <. 05). Conclusions Like mothers, fathers' involvement declines modestly during early adolescence. Different aspects of paternal involvement influence or are influenced by youths' self-management. Communication about ways to enhance fathers' involvement before this transition may help prevent or reduce declining diabetes management and control common in adolescence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)74-83
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Fathers
Self Care
Mothers
Communication
Growth

Keywords

  • adherence
  • children and adolescents
  • fatherhood
  • type 1 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Patterns and predictors of paternal involvement in early adolescents' type 1 diabetes management over 3 years. / Hilliard, Marisa E.; Rohan, Jennifer M.; Rausch, Joseph R.; Delamater, Alan M; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Drotar, Dennis.

In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Vol. 39, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 74-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hilliard, Marisa E. ; Rohan, Jennifer M. ; Rausch, Joseph R. ; Delamater, Alan M ; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff ; Drotar, Dennis. / Patterns and predictors of paternal involvement in early adolescents' type 1 diabetes management over 3 years. In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology. 2014 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 74-83.
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