Patients with type 1 Gaucher disease in South Florida, USA: Demographics, genotypes, disease severity and treatment outcomes

Marissa Orenstein, Deborah S Barbouth, Olaf A. Bodamer, Neal J. Weinreb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Gaucher disease, an autosomal recessive condition due to deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase, is a multisystemic disease, with variable age of onset, severity and progression. It is classified into subtypes delineated by the absence (type 1) or presence (type 2 and 3) of primary nervous system involvement. The ethnically diverse, largely immigrant population in South Florida has a spectrum of Gaucher disease phenotypes, creating a challenge for optimization of disease management and an opportunity to explore treatment patterns. Methods. Ninety-three records from patients with Gaucher type I in South Florida were retrieved from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Registry. Individual genotypes were correlated with severity scores and success at achieving published therapeutic goals for haemoglobin concentration, platelet count, spleen volume, liver volume and amelioration of bone pain and bone crises. Results: The majority of patients were diagnosed during the fifth decade of life. Almost two-thirds were homozygous for the N370S mutation, reflecting the large Ashkenazi Jewish population in South Florida. The majority received imiglucerase (62.8%) at various intervals. 24.5% of patients underwent splenectomy before starting enzyme replacement therapy. After a median 12 treatment years, South Florida patients matched or exceeded the ICCG 4 year therapeutic goal achievement for platelet count (85.4% vs. 79.6% success), spleen volume (93.3% vs. 78.0% success), liver volume (93.4% vs. 90.6% success), and bone crises (100% vs. 99% success). Nevertheless, fewer patients with intact spleens had sustained achievement of all 6 therapeutic goals (30.4% versus 41.4%) and only 40% of the splenectomy patients sustained achievement of 5/5 possible goals. 54.7% of the intact spleen patients continued to have bone pain vs. 29.8% in ICCG. Significantly, only 37% of the ICGG patient cohort had bone pain prior to initiation of treatment compared to 73.4% of the South Florida patients (moderate or severe pain in 59.6%). Conclusions: Demographic characteristics are a significant determinant of the differences in response to treatment observed in South Florida Gaucher patients compared to those described in the international population enrolled in the ICGG Gaucher Registry. Individual genotypes and ethnic background are important considerations for optimizing patient care for Gaucher disease.

Original languageEnglish
Article number45
JournalOrphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 31 2014

Fingerprint

Gaucher Disease
Genotype
Demography
Spleen
Bone and Bones
Pain
Splenectomy
Platelet Count
Therapeutics
Registries
Population
Enzyme Replacement Therapy
Liver
Disease Management
Age of Onset
Nervous System
Patient Care
Hemoglobins
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Enzyme replacement therapy
  • Gaucher disease
  • Genotype
  • Glucocerebrosidase
  • Natural history
  • Phenotype
  • Severity score
  • South Florida
  • Treatment outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Patients with type 1 Gaucher disease in South Florida, USA : Demographics, genotypes, disease severity and treatment outcomes. / Orenstein, Marissa; Barbouth, Deborah S; Bodamer, Olaf A.; Weinreb, Neal J.

In: Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, Vol. 9, No. 1, 45, 31.03.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Weinreb, Neal J.

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N2 - Background: Gaucher disease, an autosomal recessive condition due to deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase, is a multisystemic disease, with variable age of onset, severity and progression. It is classified into subtypes delineated by the absence (type 1) or presence (type 2 and 3) of primary nervous system involvement. The ethnically diverse, largely immigrant population in South Florida has a spectrum of Gaucher disease phenotypes, creating a challenge for optimization of disease management and an opportunity to explore treatment patterns. Methods. Ninety-three records from patients with Gaucher type I in South Florida were retrieved from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Registry. Individual genotypes were correlated with severity scores and success at achieving published therapeutic goals for haemoglobin concentration, platelet count, spleen volume, liver volume and amelioration of bone pain and bone crises. Results: The majority of patients were diagnosed during the fifth decade of life. Almost two-thirds were homozygous for the N370S mutation, reflecting the large Ashkenazi Jewish population in South Florida. The majority received imiglucerase (62.8%) at various intervals. 24.5% of patients underwent splenectomy before starting enzyme replacement therapy. After a median 12 treatment years, South Florida patients matched or exceeded the ICCG 4 year therapeutic goal achievement for platelet count (85.4% vs. 79.6% success), spleen volume (93.3% vs. 78.0% success), liver volume (93.4% vs. 90.6% success), and bone crises (100% vs. 99% success). Nevertheless, fewer patients with intact spleens had sustained achievement of all 6 therapeutic goals (30.4% versus 41.4%) and only 40% of the splenectomy patients sustained achievement of 5/5 possible goals. 54.7% of the intact spleen patients continued to have bone pain vs. 29.8% in ICCG. Significantly, only 37% of the ICGG patient cohort had bone pain prior to initiation of treatment compared to 73.4% of the South Florida patients (moderate or severe pain in 59.6%). Conclusions: Demographic characteristics are a significant determinant of the differences in response to treatment observed in South Florida Gaucher patients compared to those described in the international population enrolled in the ICGG Gaucher Registry. Individual genotypes and ethnic background are important considerations for optimizing patient care for Gaucher disease.

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KW - Treatment outcomes

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