Patient-reported outcomes following platelet-rich plasma injections in treating osteochondral lesions of the talus

A critically appraised topic

Samuel F. Jazzo, Daniel Scribner, Stephanie Shay, Min Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clinical Scenario: Osteochondral lesions (OCLs) of the talus can result from ankle sprains which are the most common injury in the physically active. Recently, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been used to develop an innovate treatment for OCLs of the talus. Clinical Question: Do PRP injections improve self-reported pain and ankle function in patients with OCL of the talus? Summary of Key Findings: 3 randomized controlled trials were included. One of the studies compared a single dose of PRP to a single dose of hyaluronic acid (HA) or saline when added as an adjunct to microfracture surgery. Another study compared a group receiving a single dose of PRP after microfracture surgery to a group that only received microfracture surgery. The last study compared a series of 3 PRP injections to a series of 3 HA injections. In all 3 studies PRP appeared to bemore effective in pain and function outcomes than comparison treatments. The superior outcomes of PRP were demonstrated at times as short as 4 weeks and as long as 25 months. Clinical Bottom Line: There is moderate to strong evidence that PRP produces favorable, short-term, pain and function results compared to HA, saline, and/or microfracture surgery alone. Strength of Recommendation: Level 2.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-184
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Sport Rehabilitation
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

Fingerprint

Talus
Platelet-Rich Plasma
Stress Fractures
Injections
Hyaluronic Acid
Pain
Ankle Injuries
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Ankle
Randomized Controlled Trials
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Ankle dysfunction
  • Ankle injury
  • Ankle pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Patient-reported outcomes following platelet-rich plasma injections in treating osteochondral lesions of the talus : A critically appraised topic. / Jazzo, Samuel F.; Scribner, Daniel; Shay, Stephanie; Kim, Min.

In: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, Vol. 27, No. 2, 01.03.2018, p. 177-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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