Patient-initiated treatment of uncomplicated recurrent urinary tract infections in young women

K. Gupta, Thomas Hooton, P. L. Roberts, W. E. Stamm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

161 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common outpatient problem, resulting in frequent office visits and often requiring the use of prophylactic antimicrobial agents. Patient-initiated treatment of recurrent UTIs may decrease antimicrobial use and improve patient convenience. Objective: To determine the safety and feasibility of patient-initiated treatment of recurrent UTIs. Design: Uncontrolled, prospective clinical trial. Setting: University-based primary health care clinic. Participants: Women at least 18 years of age with a history of recurrent UTIs and no recent pregnancy, hypertension, diabetes, or renal disease. Intervention: After self-diagnosing UTI on the basis of symptoms, participating women initiated therapy with ofloxacin or levofloxacin. Measurements: Accuracy of self-diagnosis determined by evidence of a definite (culture-positive) or probable (sterile pyuria and no alternative diagnosis) UTI on pretherapy urinalysis and culture. Women with a self-diagnosis of UTI that was not microbiologically confirmed were evaluated for alternative diagnoses. Post-therapy interviews and urine cultures were used to assess clinical and microbiological cure rates, adverse events, and patient satisfaction. Results: 88 of 172 women self-diagnosed a total of 172 UTIs. Laboratory evaluation showed a uropathogen in 144 cases (84%), sterile pyuria in 19 cases (11%), and no pyuria or bacteriuria in 9 cases (5%). Clinical and microbiological cures occurred in 92% and 96%, respectively, of culture-confirmed episodes. No serious adverse events occurred. Conclusion: Adherent women can accurately self-diagnose and self-treat recurrent UTIs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-16
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume135
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 3 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Urinary Tract Infections
Pyuria
Therapeutics
Office Visits
Bacteriuria
Levofloxacin
Ofloxacin
Urinalysis
Patient Safety
Anti-Infective Agents
Patient Satisfaction
Primary Health Care
Outpatients
Clinical Trials
Urine
Interviews
Hypertension
Kidney
Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Patient-initiated treatment of uncomplicated recurrent urinary tract infections in young women. / Gupta, K.; Hooton, Thomas; Roberts, P. L.; Stamm, W. E.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 135, No. 1, 03.07.2001, p. 9-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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