Pathophysiology of acute wound healing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

507 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Wound healing is a complex process that can be divided into at least 3 continuous and overlapping processes: an inflammatory reaction, a proliferative process leading to tissue restoration, and, eventually, tissue remodeling. Wound healing processes are strictly regulated by multiple growth factors and cytokines released at the wound site. Although the desirable final result of coordinated healing would be the formation of tissue with a similar structure and comparable functions as with intact skin, regeneration is uncommon (with notable exceptions such as early fetal healing); healing however results in a structurally and functionally satisfactory but not identical outcome. Alterations that disrupt controlled healing processes would extend tissue damage and repair. The pathobiologic states may lead to chronic or nonhealing wounds or excessive fibrosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-18
Number of pages10
JournalClinics in Dermatology
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

Fingerprint

Wound Healing
Wounds and Injuries
Regeneration
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Fibrosis
Cytokines
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Pathophysiology of acute wound healing. / Li, Jie; Chen, Juan; Kirsner, Robert.

In: Clinics in Dermatology, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.01.2007, p. 9-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, Jie ; Chen, Juan ; Kirsner, Robert. / Pathophysiology of acute wound healing. In: Clinics in Dermatology. 2007 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 9-18.
@article{6557cedac48f4861960ebeabb43d09cc,
title = "Pathophysiology of acute wound healing",
abstract = "Wound healing is a complex process that can be divided into at least 3 continuous and overlapping processes: an inflammatory reaction, a proliferative process leading to tissue restoration, and, eventually, tissue remodeling. Wound healing processes are strictly regulated by multiple growth factors and cytokines released at the wound site. Although the desirable final result of coordinated healing would be the formation of tissue with a similar structure and comparable functions as with intact skin, regeneration is uncommon (with notable exceptions such as early fetal healing); healing however results in a structurally and functionally satisfactory but not identical outcome. Alterations that disrupt controlled healing processes would extend tissue damage and repair. The pathobiologic states may lead to chronic or nonhealing wounds or excessive fibrosis.",
author = "Jie Li and Juan Chen and Robert Kirsner",
year = "2007",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.clindermatol.2006.09.007",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "9--18",
journal = "Clinics in Dermatology",
issn = "0738-081X",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pathophysiology of acute wound healing

AU - Li, Jie

AU - Chen, Juan

AU - Kirsner, Robert

PY - 2007/1/1

Y1 - 2007/1/1

N2 - Wound healing is a complex process that can be divided into at least 3 continuous and overlapping processes: an inflammatory reaction, a proliferative process leading to tissue restoration, and, eventually, tissue remodeling. Wound healing processes are strictly regulated by multiple growth factors and cytokines released at the wound site. Although the desirable final result of coordinated healing would be the formation of tissue with a similar structure and comparable functions as with intact skin, regeneration is uncommon (with notable exceptions such as early fetal healing); healing however results in a structurally and functionally satisfactory but not identical outcome. Alterations that disrupt controlled healing processes would extend tissue damage and repair. The pathobiologic states may lead to chronic or nonhealing wounds or excessive fibrosis.

AB - Wound healing is a complex process that can be divided into at least 3 continuous and overlapping processes: an inflammatory reaction, a proliferative process leading to tissue restoration, and, eventually, tissue remodeling. Wound healing processes are strictly regulated by multiple growth factors and cytokines released at the wound site. Although the desirable final result of coordinated healing would be the formation of tissue with a similar structure and comparable functions as with intact skin, regeneration is uncommon (with notable exceptions such as early fetal healing); healing however results in a structurally and functionally satisfactory but not identical outcome. Alterations that disrupt controlled healing processes would extend tissue damage and repair. The pathobiologic states may lead to chronic or nonhealing wounds or excessive fibrosis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33846627240&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33846627240&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2006.09.007

DO - 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2006.09.007

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 9

EP - 18

JO - Clinics in Dermatology

JF - Clinics in Dermatology

SN - 0738-081X

IS - 1

ER -