Partner responses to pain behaviors are associated with depression and activity interference among persons with chronic pain and spinal cord injury

Michael W. Stroud, Judith A. Turner, Mark P. Jensen, Diana D. Cardenas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the extent to which psychosocial factors (partner responses to pain behaviors, social support) are associated with pain-related activity interference and depressive symptom severity among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and chronic pain. Seventy adults (45 men, 25 women) with SCI and pain and 68 partners completed Part II of the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory, a measure of partner responses to pain behaviors. Individuals with SCI and pain also completed the Social Support Questionnaire-6, a modified Brief Pain Inventory Pain Interference Scale, and the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale. SCI subject ratings of partner responses to pain behaviors, but not partner ratings, were associated significantly with pain-related activity interference and depressive symptom severity. Negative partner response to pain behaviors explained the most variance in these 2 outcome measures. The results provide preliminary support for the importance of partner responses to pain behaviors in outcomes of individuals with chronic pain and SCI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-99
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pain
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2006

Keywords

  • Chronic pain
  • Depression
  • Pain behaviors
  • Social support
  • Spinal cord injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Nursing(all)

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