Part-time physicians... prevalent, connected, and satisfied

Hilit Mechaber, Rachel B. Levine, Linda Baier Manwell, Marlon P. Mundt, Mark Linzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The health care workforce is evolving and part-time practice is increasing. The objective of this work is to determine the relationship between part-time status, workplace conditions, and physician outcomes. DESIGN: Minimizing error, maximizing outcome (MEMO) study surveyed generalist physicians and their patients in the upper Midwest and New York City. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Physician survey of stress, burnout, job satisfaction, work control, intent to leave, and organizational climate. Patient survey of satisfaction and trust. Responses compared by part-time and full-time physician status; 2-part regression analyses assessed outcomes associated with part-time status. Of 751 physicians contacted, 422 (56%) participated. Eighteen percent reported part-time status (n=77, 31% of women, 8% of men, p<.001). Part-time physicians reported less burnout (p<.01), higher satisfaction (p<.001), and greater work control (p<.001) than full-time physicians. Intent to leave and assessments of organizational climate were similar between physician groups. A survey of 1,795 patients revealed no significant differences in satisfaction and trust between part-time and full-time physicians. CONCLUSIONS: Part-time is a successful practice style for physicians and their patients. If favorable outcomes influence career choice, an increased demand for part-time practice is likely to occur.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)300-303
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008

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Physicians
Career Choice
Health Manpower
Job Satisfaction
Patient Satisfaction
Workplace
Regression Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Delivery of Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Part-time
  • Physicians
  • Work hours
  • Workplace

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Part-time physicians... prevalent, connected, and satisfied. / Mechaber, Hilit; Levine, Rachel B.; Manwell, Linda Baier; Mundt, Marlon P.; Linzer, Mark.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 3, 01.03.2008, p. 300-303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mechaber, Hilit ; Levine, Rachel B. ; Manwell, Linda Baier ; Mundt, Marlon P. ; Linzer, Mark. / Part-time physicians... prevalent, connected, and satisfied. In: Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 300-303.
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