Parenteral transmission of HIV among injection drug users: Assessing the frequency of multiperson use of needles, syringes, cookers, cotton, and water

Clyde B. McCoy, Lisa R. Metsch, Dale D. Chitwood, Paul Shapshak, Samuel T. Comerford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To describe and estimate the frequency of different types of drug preparation and injection practices that could result in the transfer of blood and blood-borne infections among injection drug users (IDUs). Methods: We analyzed data from interviews administered to 12,323 active IDUs recruited from 19 sites in the United States. The interviews ascertained drug-related behaviors during the previous 30 days. Results: 31.9% of IDUs reported that they engaged in the use of both needle/ syringes and cookers/cotton/water previously used by another IDU; 8.6% engaged only in the use of needle/syringes previously used by another IDU; 17.5% engaged only in the use of cookers/cotton/water previously used by another IDU; and 42.0% reported using neither needle/syringes nor cookers/cotton/water previously used by another IDU. Only 12.6% reported use of new (never-used) needle/syringes. The 3935 IDUs who used both needle/syringes and cookers/cotton/water that had been previously used by another IDU had more than 311,000 potential exposures to blood-borne infections from these high-risk practices in 30 days; about 64% of these exposures were from multiperson use of cookers/cotton/water. Conclusions: Programs to limit parenteral transmission of HIV and other blood-borne infections among IDUs must consider all drug preparation and injection practices that could allow transfer of blood and blood-borne infections among IDUs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S25-S29
JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Human Retrovirology
Volume18
Issue numberSUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1998

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Keywords

  • Cooker
  • Cotton
  • Drug equipment
  • HIV
  • Injection drug users
  • Risk practices
  • Shating drugs and drug preparation equipment
  • Shooting galleries
  • Syringes
  • Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Virology

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