Parent–Child Interaction Therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder and a matched case-control sample

Meaghan V. Parladé, Allison Weinstein, Dainelys Garcia, Amelia M. Rowley, Nicole C. Ginn, Jason F. Jent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Parent–Child Interaction Therapy is an empirically based, behavioral parent training program for young children exhibiting disruptive behaviors. Parent–Child Interaction Therapy shows promise for treating disruptive behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorder. Treatment processes (i.e. treatment length and homework compliance), parenting skills, parenting stress, and behavioral outcomes (i.e. disruptive and externalizing behaviors and executive functioning) were compared in 16 children with autism spectrum disorder and 16 children without autism spectrum disorder matched on gender, age, and initial intensity of disruptive behaviors. Samples were statistically similar in terms of child receptive language, child race and ethnicity, parent age, gender and education, and number of two-parent families in treatment. Families received standard, mastery-based Parent–Child Interaction Therapy. Both groups demonstrated significant and clinically meaningful improvements in child disruptive and externalizing behavior and executive functioning, parenting skills, and parenting stress. Length of treatment, homework compliance, and parent and child outcomes did not differ significantly between groups. A subset of children with autism spectrum disorder also showed significant improvements in social responsiveness, adaptive skills, and restricted/repetitive behaviors. This study replicates and extends prior research by demonstrating that children with and without autism spectrum disorder experience similar benefits following Parent–Child Interaction Therapy. Findings may expand the availability and dissemination of time-limited, evidence-based interventions for autism spectrum disorder and comorbid disruptive behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAutism
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Parenting
Therapeutics
Compliance
Education
Child Language
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Child Behavior
Problem Behavior
Research

Keywords

  • autism spectrum disorder
  • behavioral parent training
  • disruptive behavior
  • evidence-based treatments
  • Parent–Child Interaction Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Parent–Child Interaction Therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder and a matched case-control sample. / Parladé, Meaghan V.; Weinstein, Allison; Garcia, Dainelys; Rowley, Amelia M.; Ginn, Nicole C.; Jent, Jason F.

In: Autism, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Parladé, Meaghan V. ; Weinstein, Allison ; Garcia, Dainelys ; Rowley, Amelia M. ; Ginn, Nicole C. ; Jent, Jason F. / Parent–Child Interaction Therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder and a matched case-control sample. In: Autism. 2019.
@article{591ce8f1e3104cdc9bfaafc4601e20fd,
title = "Parent–Child Interaction Therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder and a matched case-control sample",
abstract = "Parent–Child Interaction Therapy is an empirically based, behavioral parent training program for young children exhibiting disruptive behaviors. Parent–Child Interaction Therapy shows promise for treating disruptive behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorder. Treatment processes (i.e. treatment length and homework compliance), parenting skills, parenting stress, and behavioral outcomes (i.e. disruptive and externalizing behaviors and executive functioning) were compared in 16 children with autism spectrum disorder and 16 children without autism spectrum disorder matched on gender, age, and initial intensity of disruptive behaviors. Samples were statistically similar in terms of child receptive language, child race and ethnicity, parent age, gender and education, and number of two-parent families in treatment. Families received standard, mastery-based Parent–Child Interaction Therapy. Both groups demonstrated significant and clinically meaningful improvements in child disruptive and externalizing behavior and executive functioning, parenting skills, and parenting stress. Length of treatment, homework compliance, and parent and child outcomes did not differ significantly between groups. A subset of children with autism spectrum disorder also showed significant improvements in social responsiveness, adaptive skills, and restricted/repetitive behaviors. This study replicates and extends prior research by demonstrating that children with and without autism spectrum disorder experience similar benefits following Parent–Child Interaction Therapy. Findings may expand the availability and dissemination of time-limited, evidence-based interventions for autism spectrum disorder and comorbid disruptive behaviors.",
keywords = "autism spectrum disorder, behavioral parent training, disruptive behavior, evidence-based treatments, Parent–Child Interaction Therapy",
author = "Parlad{\'e}, {Meaghan V.} and Allison Weinstein and Dainelys Garcia and Rowley, {Amelia M.} and Ginn, {Nicole C.} and Jent, {Jason F.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1362361319855851",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Autism",
issn = "1362-3613",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parent–Child Interaction Therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder and a matched case-control sample

AU - Parladé, Meaghan V.

AU - Weinstein, Allison

AU - Garcia, Dainelys

AU - Rowley, Amelia M.

AU - Ginn, Nicole C.

AU - Jent, Jason F.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Parent–Child Interaction Therapy is an empirically based, behavioral parent training program for young children exhibiting disruptive behaviors. Parent–Child Interaction Therapy shows promise for treating disruptive behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorder. Treatment processes (i.e. treatment length and homework compliance), parenting skills, parenting stress, and behavioral outcomes (i.e. disruptive and externalizing behaviors and executive functioning) were compared in 16 children with autism spectrum disorder and 16 children without autism spectrum disorder matched on gender, age, and initial intensity of disruptive behaviors. Samples were statistically similar in terms of child receptive language, child race and ethnicity, parent age, gender and education, and number of two-parent families in treatment. Families received standard, mastery-based Parent–Child Interaction Therapy. Both groups demonstrated significant and clinically meaningful improvements in child disruptive and externalizing behavior and executive functioning, parenting skills, and parenting stress. Length of treatment, homework compliance, and parent and child outcomes did not differ significantly between groups. A subset of children with autism spectrum disorder also showed significant improvements in social responsiveness, adaptive skills, and restricted/repetitive behaviors. This study replicates and extends prior research by demonstrating that children with and without autism spectrum disorder experience similar benefits following Parent–Child Interaction Therapy. Findings may expand the availability and dissemination of time-limited, evidence-based interventions for autism spectrum disorder and comorbid disruptive behaviors.

AB - Parent–Child Interaction Therapy is an empirically based, behavioral parent training program for young children exhibiting disruptive behaviors. Parent–Child Interaction Therapy shows promise for treating disruptive behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorder. Treatment processes (i.e. treatment length and homework compliance), parenting skills, parenting stress, and behavioral outcomes (i.e. disruptive and externalizing behaviors and executive functioning) were compared in 16 children with autism spectrum disorder and 16 children without autism spectrum disorder matched on gender, age, and initial intensity of disruptive behaviors. Samples were statistically similar in terms of child receptive language, child race and ethnicity, parent age, gender and education, and number of two-parent families in treatment. Families received standard, mastery-based Parent–Child Interaction Therapy. Both groups demonstrated significant and clinically meaningful improvements in child disruptive and externalizing behavior and executive functioning, parenting skills, and parenting stress. Length of treatment, homework compliance, and parent and child outcomes did not differ significantly between groups. A subset of children with autism spectrum disorder also showed significant improvements in social responsiveness, adaptive skills, and restricted/repetitive behaviors. This study replicates and extends prior research by demonstrating that children with and without autism spectrum disorder experience similar benefits following Parent–Child Interaction Therapy. Findings may expand the availability and dissemination of time-limited, evidence-based interventions for autism spectrum disorder and comorbid disruptive behaviors.

KW - autism spectrum disorder

KW - behavioral parent training

KW - disruptive behavior

KW - evidence-based treatments

KW - Parent–Child Interaction Therapy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85067791412&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85067791412&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1362361319855851

DO - 10.1177/1362361319855851

M3 - Article

C2 - 31187642

AN - SCOPUS:85067791412

JO - Autism

JF - Autism

SN - 1362-3613

ER -