Parental emotion regulation strategy use and responses to youth negative affect

Cara S. Remmes, Jill Ehrenreich-May

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Parental responses to youth negative affect have been associated with social and emotional outcomes in youth. However, the association between such parenting behaviors and essential components of youth emotion regulation is not well studied, especially in youth with anxiety and depressive disorders. This investigation examined the influence of parents' emotion regulation strategies and their responses to youth negative affect on adolescent-reported emotional awareness and emotional expression in a clinical sample of youth with anxiety disorders. In addition, this study examined the relationship between parent-reported use of emotion regulation strategies and parental reactions to youth negative affect. Questionnaires were completed by 67 adolescents (ages 12-18 years) and by one of their parents during an intake assessment at a university-based clinic. Adolescents had a primary anxiety or depressive disorder diagnosis. Results indicated a positive relationship between parent-reported use of suppression and youth report of poor emotional understanding in adolescents with a primary anxiety or depressive disorder. A positive relationship between parent-reported use of reappraisal and emotion-coaching responses to youth negative affect was also found. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed in the context of parental socialization of youth emotion regulation and in terms of prevention and intervention efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-47
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Cognitive Psychotherapy
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Emotion regulation
  • Parenting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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