Pancreatic cancer clusters and arsenic-contaminated drinking water wells in Florida

Wen Liu-Mares, Jill A. MacKinnon, Recinda Sherman, Lora E. Fleming, Caio Rocha-Lima, Jennifer Hu, David J Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We sought to identify high-risk areas of pancreatic cancer incidence, and determine if clusters of persons diagnosed with pancreatic cancer were more likely to be located near arsenic-contaminated drinking water wells. Methods: A total of 5,707 arsenic samples were collected from December 2000 to May 2008 by the Florida Department of Health, representing more than 5,000 individual privately owned wells. During that period, 0.010 ppm (10 ppb) or greater arsenic levels in private well water were considered as the threshold based on standard of United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Spatial modeling was applied to pancreatic cancer cases diagnosed between 1998-2002 in Florida (n = 11,405). Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine if sociodemographic indicators, smoking history, and proximity to arsenic-contaminated well sites were associated with residence at the time of pancreatic cancer diagnosis occurring within versus outside a cluster. Results: Spatial modeling identified 16 clusters in which 22.6% of all pancreatic cancer cases were located. Cases living within 1 mile of known arsenic-contaminated wells were significantly more likely to be diagnosed within a cluster of pancreatic cancers relative to cases living more than 3 miles from known sites (odds ratio = 2.1 [95% CI = 1.9, 2.4]). Conclusions: Exposure to arsenic-contaminated drinking water wells may be associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, case-control studies are needed in order to confirm the findings of this ecological analysis. These cluster areas may be appropriate to evaluate pancreatic cancer risk factors, and to perform targeted screening and prevention studies.

Original languageEnglish
Article number111
JournalBMC Cancer
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 12 2013

Fingerprint

Water Wells
Arsenic
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Drinking Water
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Case-Control Studies
Logistic Models
Smoking
History
Odds Ratio

Keywords

  • Arsenic
  • Epidemiology
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research
  • Genetics

Cite this

Pancreatic cancer clusters and arsenic-contaminated drinking water wells in Florida. / Liu-Mares, Wen; MacKinnon, Jill A.; Sherman, Recinda; Fleming, Lora E.; Rocha-Lima, Caio; Hu, Jennifer; Lee, David J.

In: BMC Cancer, Vol. 13, 111, 12.03.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liu-Mares W, MacKinnon JA, Sherman R, Fleming LE, Rocha-Lima C, Hu J et al. Pancreatic cancer clusters and arsenic-contaminated drinking water wells in Florida. BMC Cancer. 2013 Mar 12;13. 111. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2407-13-111
Liu-Mares, Wen ; MacKinnon, Jill A. ; Sherman, Recinda ; Fleming, Lora E. ; Rocha-Lima, Caio ; Hu, Jennifer ; Lee, David J. / Pancreatic cancer clusters and arsenic-contaminated drinking water wells in Florida. In: BMC Cancer. 2013 ; Vol. 13.
@article{854fd60998094d15adda368144100fa3,
title = "Pancreatic cancer clusters and arsenic-contaminated drinking water wells in Florida",
abstract = "Background: We sought to identify high-risk areas of pancreatic cancer incidence, and determine if clusters of persons diagnosed with pancreatic cancer were more likely to be located near arsenic-contaminated drinking water wells. Methods: A total of 5,707 arsenic samples were collected from December 2000 to May 2008 by the Florida Department of Health, representing more than 5,000 individual privately owned wells. During that period, 0.010 ppm (10 ppb) or greater arsenic levels in private well water were considered as the threshold based on standard of United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Spatial modeling was applied to pancreatic cancer cases diagnosed between 1998-2002 in Florida (n = 11,405). Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine if sociodemographic indicators, smoking history, and proximity to arsenic-contaminated well sites were associated with residence at the time of pancreatic cancer diagnosis occurring within versus outside a cluster. Results: Spatial modeling identified 16 clusters in which 22.6{\%} of all pancreatic cancer cases were located. Cases living within 1 mile of known arsenic-contaminated wells were significantly more likely to be diagnosed within a cluster of pancreatic cancers relative to cases living more than 3 miles from known sites (odds ratio = 2.1 [95{\%} CI = 1.9, 2.4]). Conclusions: Exposure to arsenic-contaminated drinking water wells may be associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, case-control studies are needed in order to confirm the findings of this ecological analysis. These cluster areas may be appropriate to evaluate pancreatic cancer risk factors, and to perform targeted screening and prevention studies.",
keywords = "Arsenic, Epidemiology, Pancreatic cancer, Screening",
author = "Wen Liu-Mares and MacKinnon, {Jill A.} and Recinda Sherman and Fleming, {Lora E.} and Caio Rocha-Lima and Jennifer Hu and Lee, {David J}",
year = "2013",
month = "3",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1186/1471-2407-13-111",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
journal = "BMC Cancer",
issn = "1471-2407",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pancreatic cancer clusters and arsenic-contaminated drinking water wells in Florida

AU - Liu-Mares, Wen

AU - MacKinnon, Jill A.

AU - Sherman, Recinda

AU - Fleming, Lora E.

AU - Rocha-Lima, Caio

AU - Hu, Jennifer

AU - Lee, David J

PY - 2013/3/12

Y1 - 2013/3/12

N2 - Background: We sought to identify high-risk areas of pancreatic cancer incidence, and determine if clusters of persons diagnosed with pancreatic cancer were more likely to be located near arsenic-contaminated drinking water wells. Methods: A total of 5,707 arsenic samples were collected from December 2000 to May 2008 by the Florida Department of Health, representing more than 5,000 individual privately owned wells. During that period, 0.010 ppm (10 ppb) or greater arsenic levels in private well water were considered as the threshold based on standard of United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Spatial modeling was applied to pancreatic cancer cases diagnosed between 1998-2002 in Florida (n = 11,405). Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine if sociodemographic indicators, smoking history, and proximity to arsenic-contaminated well sites were associated with residence at the time of pancreatic cancer diagnosis occurring within versus outside a cluster. Results: Spatial modeling identified 16 clusters in which 22.6% of all pancreatic cancer cases were located. Cases living within 1 mile of known arsenic-contaminated wells were significantly more likely to be diagnosed within a cluster of pancreatic cancers relative to cases living more than 3 miles from known sites (odds ratio = 2.1 [95% CI = 1.9, 2.4]). Conclusions: Exposure to arsenic-contaminated drinking water wells may be associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, case-control studies are needed in order to confirm the findings of this ecological analysis. These cluster areas may be appropriate to evaluate pancreatic cancer risk factors, and to perform targeted screening and prevention studies.

AB - Background: We sought to identify high-risk areas of pancreatic cancer incidence, and determine if clusters of persons diagnosed with pancreatic cancer were more likely to be located near arsenic-contaminated drinking water wells. Methods: A total of 5,707 arsenic samples were collected from December 2000 to May 2008 by the Florida Department of Health, representing more than 5,000 individual privately owned wells. During that period, 0.010 ppm (10 ppb) or greater arsenic levels in private well water were considered as the threshold based on standard of United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Spatial modeling was applied to pancreatic cancer cases diagnosed between 1998-2002 in Florida (n = 11,405). Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine if sociodemographic indicators, smoking history, and proximity to arsenic-contaminated well sites were associated with residence at the time of pancreatic cancer diagnosis occurring within versus outside a cluster. Results: Spatial modeling identified 16 clusters in which 22.6% of all pancreatic cancer cases were located. Cases living within 1 mile of known arsenic-contaminated wells were significantly more likely to be diagnosed within a cluster of pancreatic cancers relative to cases living more than 3 miles from known sites (odds ratio = 2.1 [95% CI = 1.9, 2.4]). Conclusions: Exposure to arsenic-contaminated drinking water wells may be associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, case-control studies are needed in order to confirm the findings of this ecological analysis. These cluster areas may be appropriate to evaluate pancreatic cancer risk factors, and to perform targeted screening and prevention studies.

KW - Arsenic

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Pancreatic cancer

KW - Screening

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84874803943&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84874803943&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/1471-2407-13-111

DO - 10.1186/1471-2407-13-111

M3 - Article

C2 - 23510413

AN - SCOPUS:84874803943

VL - 13

JO - BMC Cancer

JF - BMC Cancer

SN - 1471-2407

M1 - 111

ER -