Pacifying effects of nonnutritive sucking on term and preterm neonates during heelstick procedures

Tiffany M Field, E. Goldson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

170 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Behavioral state, heart rate, and respiration were monitored during heelstick procedures in samples of healthy, term neonates (N = 48) and preterm neonates treated in minimal care (N = 48) and intensive care (N = 48) nurseries. The treated infants who were given pacifiers spent significantly less time fussing and crying during and following the heelstick procedures. Physiologic arousal was monitored in both preterm groups but was attenuated only in the preterm infants who received pacifiers (minimal care group). As similar amounts of sucking were observed in both preterm groups, the inconsistency in treatment effects on behavioral and physiologic arousal was interpreted as a lack of cardiac-somatic coupling in the neonate in intensive care. Results suggest that nonnutritive sucking during heelstick procedures may attenuate behavioral distress in all neonates and physiologic arousal in neonates with less severe postnatal complications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1012-1015
Number of pages4
JournalPediatrics
Volume74
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1 1984

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Newborn Infant
Arousal
Pacifiers
Critical Care
Crying
Nurseries
Premature Infants
Respiration
Heart Rate
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Pacifying effects of nonnutritive sucking on term and preterm neonates during heelstick procedures. / Field, Tiffany M; Goldson, E.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 74, No. 6, 01.12.1984, p. 1012-1015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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