Oxyhemoglobin desaturation and aberrant carbon dioxide homeostasis during electrically stimulated exercise in a ventilator-dependent tetraplegic patient

Mark S. Nash, Patrick L. Jacobs, Kathleen M. Klerk, Barth A. Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This single-subject case examined oxyhemoglobin saturation and alveolar end-tidal carbon dioxide levels in a ventilator-dependent tetraplegic patient undergoing electrical stimulation cycle ergometry. When exercising with a closed tracheostomy cuff under resting ventilator settings (resting intermittent mandatory ventilation; frequency = 6breaths/min, tidal volume = 83.3mL, minute ventilation =5L/min), his oxyhemoglobin saturation decreased from 100% to 92%, while alveolar end-tidal carbon dioxide increased linearly to 47mmHg. These undesirable changes were corrected under adjusted intermittent mandatory ventilation conditions (frequency = 12breaths/min, tidal volume = 83.3mL, minute ventilation = 10L/min), during which oxyhemoglobin saturation remained above 98% and the alveolar end-tidal carbon dioxide trend resembled that of ventilator-independent tetraplegic individuals undergoing the same exercise. Because the subject's heart rate was higher under adjusted ventilation conditions, these responses may have been caused by augmented venous return resulting from greater abdominothoracic pumping at the higher breathing frequency. These findings support the need to modify ventilator settings in ventilator-dependent tetraplegic persons while undergoing exercise to maintain oxyhemoglobin saturation and carbon dioxide homeostasis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)873-876
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of physical medicine and rehabilitation
Volume79
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Oxyhemoglobin desaturation and aberrant carbon dioxide homeostasis during electrically stimulated exercise in a ventilator-dependent tetraplegic patient'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this