Oxygen isotope variation on a lagoonal platform reef, Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef.

Peter K Swart, A. F. Wilson, J. S. Jell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The oxygen isotope ratio of the water changed by nearly 2 per mille during a 3-week period. Daily variations of 1.4 per mille were detected. As the maximum oxygen isotope ratios occurred at low tide, during times of high temperature and high salinity, temperature-induced variation in oxygen isotope ratios of skeletal material was masked. Such a phenomenon can easily explain why previous workers have failed to detect the full range of oxygen isotope ratios in coral skeletons and other calcareous organisms. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAustralian Journal of Marine & Freshwater Research
Pages813-819
Number of pages7
Volume34
Edition5
StatePublished - 1983

Fingerprint

oxygen isotope ratio
barrier reef
oxygen isotope
reef
skeleton
diurnal variation
coral
tide
salinity
temperature
water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Swart, P. K., Wilson, A. F., & Jell, J. S. (1983). Oxygen isotope variation on a lagoonal platform reef, Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef. In Australian Journal of Marine & Freshwater Research (5 ed., Vol. 34, pp. 813-819)

Oxygen isotope variation on a lagoonal platform reef, Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef. / Swart, Peter K; Wilson, A. F.; Jell, J. S.

Australian Journal of Marine & Freshwater Research. Vol. 34 5. ed. 1983. p. 813-819.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Swart, PK, Wilson, AF & Jell, JS 1983, Oxygen isotope variation on a lagoonal platform reef, Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef. in Australian Journal of Marine & Freshwater Research. 5 edn, vol. 34, pp. 813-819.
Swart PK, Wilson AF, Jell JS. Oxygen isotope variation on a lagoonal platform reef, Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef. In Australian Journal of Marine & Freshwater Research. 5 ed. Vol. 34. 1983. p. 813-819
Swart, Peter K ; Wilson, A. F. ; Jell, J. S. / Oxygen isotope variation on a lagoonal platform reef, Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef. Australian Journal of Marine & Freshwater Research. Vol. 34 5. ed. 1983. pp. 813-819
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