Overconfidence in social cognitive decision making: Correlations with social cognitive and neurocognitive performance in participants with schizophrenia and healthy individuals

Michelle M. Perez, Bianca A. Tercero, David L. Penn, Amy E. Pinkham, Philip D. Harvey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

It has been reported that people with schizophrenia are frequently overconfident relative to their performance, a trait observed in healthy individuals as well. In schizophrenia, impaired self-assessments have been found to be associated with functional impairments in various domains. Previous studies examining the correlation of overconfidence and task performance within domains (e.g., social cognition) had found overconfidence was associated with particularly poor performance. This study examines how overconfidence on a social cognitive emotion recognition task is correlated with performance on other social cognitive tests, measures of neurocognition, and intelligence. The sample includes 154 healthy controls and 218 outpatient individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. For the healthy controls, overconfidence was a significant predictor of poorer performance on social cognitive, but not neurocognitive tasks. For the participants with schizophrenia, overconfidence was a predictor of poorer performance on every performance-based task. In addition, overconfidence in healthy controls was more strongly correlated with intelligence than it was in participants with schizophrenia. The data suggest that a bias toward overestimation of performance aligns with poorer performance social cognitive domains, as well as neurocognitive domains in participants with schizophrenia. In healthy individuals, consistent with previous results, lower general intelligence seems to be a substantial predictor of overconfidence. These data suggest that attention to the accuracy of self-assessment is an area for future clinical interventions in people with schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-57
Number of pages7
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume224
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Confidence
  • Intelligence
  • Neurocognition
  • Schizophrenia
  • Self-assessment
  • Social cognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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