Overall and disease-specific survival after radical prostatectomy

Geographic uniformity

Shenghan Lai, Hong Lai, Arnon Krongrad, Bernard A. Roos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. To examine whether the survival (both overall and disease-specific) of patients who underwent radical prostatectomy varies from region to region in the United States. Previous reports have documented a geographic variation in the use of radical prostatectomy. Methods. This study was based on the data from nine geographic regions of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) for 1983 through 1992. Patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy were included in the analysis. A proportional hazards model was used to investigate whether geographic variation is associated with both overall and disease-specific survival. Results. From 1983 through 1992, the SEER Program collected information from nine geographic regions on 66,293 patients with localized prostate cancer (mean age 71.8 ± 8.4 years), who had SEER grade codes of 1, 2, or 3. Of these patients, 11,429 (mean age 65.3 ± 6.5 years) underwent radical prostatectomy and lymph node dissection. Cox's proportional hazards analyses revealed that the impact of geographic location on both overall and disease-specific survival in patients who underwent radical prostatectomy was not statistically significant. Conclusions. The results of this study indicate that the survival (both overall and disease-specific) of patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy is not influenced by geographic location, suggesting that their survival is relatively uniform across the geographic regions in the United States.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)504-509
Number of pages6
JournalUrology
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Prostatectomy
SEER Program
Survival
Geographic Locations
Prostatic Neoplasms
Lymph Node Excision
Proportional Hazards Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Overall and disease-specific survival after radical prostatectomy : Geographic uniformity. / Lai, Shenghan; Lai, Hong; Krongrad, Arnon; Roos, Bernard A.

In: Urology, Vol. 57, No. 3, 15.03.2001, p. 504-509.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lai, Shenghan ; Lai, Hong ; Krongrad, Arnon ; Roos, Bernard A. / Overall and disease-specific survival after radical prostatectomy : Geographic uniformity. In: Urology. 2001 ; Vol. 57, No. 3. pp. 504-509.
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