Over half of the far-infrared background light comes from galaxies at z ≥1.2

Mark J. Devlin, Peter A R Ade, Itziar Aretxaga, James J. Bock, Edward L. Chapin, Matthew Griffin, Joshua Gundersen, Mark Halpern, Peter C. Hargrave, David H. Hughes, Jeff Klein, Gaelen Marsden, Peter G. Martin, Philip Mauskopf, Lorenzo Moncelsi, Calvin B. Netterfield, Henry Ngo, Luca Olmi, Enzo Pascale, Guillaume PatanchonMarie Rex, Douglas Scott, Christopher Semisch, Nicholas Thomas, Matthew D P Truch, Carole Tucker, Gregory S. Tucker, Marco P. Viero, Donald V. Wiebe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Submillimetre surveys during the past decade have discovered a population of luminous, high-redshift, dusty starburst galaxies. In the redshift range 1 z 4, these massive submillimetre galaxies go through a phase characterized by optically obscured star formation at rates several hundred times that in the local Universe. Half of the starlight from this highly energetic process is absorbed and thermally re-radiated by clouds of dust at temperatures near 30 K with spectral energy distributions peaking at 100 m in the rest frame. At 1 z 4, the peak is redshifted to wavelengths between 200 and 500 m. The cumulative effect of these galaxies is to yield extragalactic optical and far-infrared backgrounds with approximately equal energy densities. Since the initial detection of the far-infrared background (FIRB), higher-resolution experiments have sought to decompose this integrated radiation into the contributions from individual galaxies. Here we report the results of an extragalactic survey at 250, 350 and 500 m. Combining our results at 500 m with those at 24 m, we determine that all of the FIRB comes from individual galaxies, with galaxies at z 1.2 accounting for 70% of it. As expected, at the longest wavelengths the signal is dominated by ultraluminous galaxies at z 1.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)737-739
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume458
Issue number7239
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 9 2009

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Galaxies
Light
Dust
Radiation
Temperature

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Devlin, M. J., Ade, P. A. R., Aretxaga, I., Bock, J. J., Chapin, E. L., Griffin, M., ... Wiebe, D. V. (2009). Over half of the far-infrared background light comes from galaxies at z ≥1.2. Nature, 458(7239), 737-739. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature07918

Over half of the far-infrared background light comes from galaxies at z ≥1.2. / Devlin, Mark J.; Ade, Peter A R; Aretxaga, Itziar; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C.; Hughes, David H.; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Martin, Peter G.; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Ngo, Henry; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S.; Viero, Marco P.; Wiebe, Donald V.

In: Nature, Vol. 458, No. 7239, 09.04.2009, p. 737-739.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Devlin, MJ, Ade, PAR, Aretxaga, I, Bock, JJ, Chapin, EL, Griffin, M, Gundersen, J, Halpern, M, Hargrave, PC, Hughes, DH, Klein, J, Marsden, G, Martin, PG, Mauskopf, P, Moncelsi, L, Netterfield, CB, Ngo, H, Olmi, L, Pascale, E, Patanchon, G, Rex, M, Scott, D, Semisch, C, Thomas, N, Truch, MDP, Tucker, C, Tucker, GS, Viero, MP & Wiebe, DV 2009, 'Over half of the far-infrared background light comes from galaxies at z ≥1.2', Nature, vol. 458, no. 7239, pp. 737-739. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature07918
Devlin MJ, Ade PAR, Aretxaga I, Bock JJ, Chapin EL, Griffin M et al. Over half of the far-infrared background light comes from galaxies at z ≥1.2. Nature. 2009 Apr 9;458(7239):737-739. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature07918
Devlin, Mark J. ; Ade, Peter A R ; Aretxaga, Itziar ; Bock, James J. ; Chapin, Edward L. ; Griffin, Matthew ; Gundersen, Joshua ; Halpern, Mark ; Hargrave, Peter C. ; Hughes, David H. ; Klein, Jeff ; Marsden, Gaelen ; Martin, Peter G. ; Mauskopf, Philip ; Moncelsi, Lorenzo ; Netterfield, Calvin B. ; Ngo, Henry ; Olmi, Luca ; Pascale, Enzo ; Patanchon, Guillaume ; Rex, Marie ; Scott, Douglas ; Semisch, Christopher ; Thomas, Nicholas ; Truch, Matthew D P ; Tucker, Carole ; Tucker, Gregory S. ; Viero, Marco P. ; Wiebe, Donald V. / Over half of the far-infrared background light comes from galaxies at z ≥1.2. In: Nature. 2009 ; Vol. 458, No. 7239. pp. 737-739.
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T1 - Over half of the far-infrared background light comes from galaxies at z ≥1.2

AU - Devlin, Mark J.

AU - Ade, Peter A R

AU - Aretxaga, Itziar

AU - Bock, James J.

AU - Chapin, Edward L.

AU - Griffin, Matthew

AU - Gundersen, Joshua

AU - Halpern, Mark

AU - Hargrave, Peter C.

AU - Hughes, David H.

AU - Klein, Jeff

AU - Marsden, Gaelen

AU - Martin, Peter G.

AU - Mauskopf, Philip

AU - Moncelsi, Lorenzo

AU - Netterfield, Calvin B.

AU - Ngo, Henry

AU - Olmi, Luca

AU - Pascale, Enzo

AU - Patanchon, Guillaume

AU - Rex, Marie

AU - Scott, Douglas

AU - Semisch, Christopher

AU - Thomas, Nicholas

AU - Truch, Matthew D P

AU - Tucker, Carole

AU - Tucker, Gregory S.

AU - Viero, Marco P.

AU - Wiebe, Donald V.

PY - 2009/4/9

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N2 - Submillimetre surveys during the past decade have discovered a population of luminous, high-redshift, dusty starburst galaxies. In the redshift range 1 z 4, these massive submillimetre galaxies go through a phase characterized by optically obscured star formation at rates several hundred times that in the local Universe. Half of the starlight from this highly energetic process is absorbed and thermally re-radiated by clouds of dust at temperatures near 30 K with spectral energy distributions peaking at 100 m in the rest frame. At 1 z 4, the peak is redshifted to wavelengths between 200 and 500 m. The cumulative effect of these galaxies is to yield extragalactic optical and far-infrared backgrounds with approximately equal energy densities. Since the initial detection of the far-infrared background (FIRB), higher-resolution experiments have sought to decompose this integrated radiation into the contributions from individual galaxies. Here we report the results of an extragalactic survey at 250, 350 and 500 m. Combining our results at 500 m with those at 24 m, we determine that all of the FIRB comes from individual galaxies, with galaxies at z 1.2 accounting for 70% of it. As expected, at the longest wavelengths the signal is dominated by ultraluminous galaxies at z 1.

AB - Submillimetre surveys during the past decade have discovered a population of luminous, high-redshift, dusty starburst galaxies. In the redshift range 1 z 4, these massive submillimetre galaxies go through a phase characterized by optically obscured star formation at rates several hundred times that in the local Universe. Half of the starlight from this highly energetic process is absorbed and thermally re-radiated by clouds of dust at temperatures near 30 K with spectral energy distributions peaking at 100 m in the rest frame. At 1 z 4, the peak is redshifted to wavelengths between 200 and 500 m. The cumulative effect of these galaxies is to yield extragalactic optical and far-infrared backgrounds with approximately equal energy densities. Since the initial detection of the far-infrared background (FIRB), higher-resolution experiments have sought to decompose this integrated radiation into the contributions from individual galaxies. Here we report the results of an extragalactic survey at 250, 350 and 500 m. Combining our results at 500 m with those at 24 m, we determine that all of the FIRB comes from individual galaxies, with galaxies at z 1.2 accounting for 70% of it. As expected, at the longest wavelengths the signal is dominated by ultraluminous galaxies at z 1.

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