Outcomes of very low birth weight twins cared for in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network's intensive care units

E. F. Donovan, R. A. Ehrenkranz, S. Shankaran, D. K. Stevenson, L. L. Wright, N. Younes, A. A. Fanaroff, S. B. Korones, B. J. Stoll, J. E. Tyson, C. R. Bauer, J. A. Lemons, W. Oh, L. A. Papile

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

73 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The study's aim was to compare outcomes of very low birth weight twins with those of matched singletons. STUDY DESIGN: With data from the Neonatal Research Network registry (May 1991 to December 1994), univariable and multivariable comparisons of very low birth weight twin pairs and singletons were performed in 2 subgroups: (1) all paired twins and singletons with birth weights between 401 and 1500 g and (2) all paired twins and singletons born at <28 weeks' gestation. RESULTS: Twins constituted 19% of infants admitted with very low birth weight. Mothers of twins were more likely to receive prenatal care, have labor, have cesarean delivery, and receive antenatal glucocorticoids. Twins were more likely to have respiratory disease and to receive surfactant. Second-born twins had more early respiratory disease but similar longer-term outcomes. The risks of death, chronic lung disease, and grade III or IV intracranial hemorrhage were similar in twins and singletons. CONCLUSIONS: Although very low birth weight twins compose a sizable proportion of admissions, in National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network intensive care units, twins and singletons have similar outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)742-749
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume179
Issue number3 I
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

Keywords

  • Morbidity
  • Mortality
  • Twins
  • Very low birth weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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