Outcome comparison of endoscopic and transpalpebral decompression for treatment of frontal migraine headaches

Mengyuan T. Liu, Harvey Chim, Bahman Guyuron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background:: This study was designed to compare the efficacy of the transpalpebral versus endoscopic approach to decompression of the supraorbital and supratrochlear nerves in patients with frontal migraine headaches. Methods:: The medical charts of 253 patients who underwent surgery for frontal migraine headaches were reviewed. These patients underwent either transpalpebral nerve decompression (n = 62) or endoscopic nerve decompression (n = 191). Preoperative and 12-month or greater postoperative migraine frequency, duration, and intensity were analyzed to determine the success of the surgeries. Results:: Forty-nine of 62 patients (79 percent) in the transpalpebral nerve decompression group and 170 of 191 patients (89 percent) who underwent endoscopic nerve decompression experienced a successful outcome (at least a 50 percent decrease in migraine frequency, duration, or intensity) after 1 year from surgery. Endoscopic nerve decompression had a significantly higher success rate than transpalpebral nerve decompression (p < 0.05). Thirty-two patients (52 percent) in the transpalpebral nerve decompression group and 128 patients (67 percent) who underwent endoscopic nerve decompression observed elimination of migraine headaches. The elimination rate was significantly higher in the endoscopic nerve decompression group than in the transpalpebral nerve decompression group (p < 0.03). Conclusion:: Endoscopic nerve decompression was found to be more successful at reducing or eliminating frontal migraine headaches than transpalpebral nerve decompression and should be selected as the first choice whenever it is anatomically feasible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1113-1119
Number of pages7
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume129
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Decompression
Migraine Disorders
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Outcome comparison of endoscopic and transpalpebral decompression for treatment of frontal migraine headaches. / Liu, Mengyuan T.; Chim, Harvey; Guyuron, Bahman.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 129, No. 5, 05.2012, p. 1113-1119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liu, Mengyuan T. ; Chim, Harvey ; Guyuron, Bahman. / Outcome comparison of endoscopic and transpalpebral decompression for treatment of frontal migraine headaches. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2012 ; Vol. 129, No. 5. pp. 1113-1119.
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