Orphan/vulnerable child caregiving moderates the association between women's autonomy and their BMI in three African countries

Mariano Kanamori, Olivia Carter-Pokras, Sangeetha Madhavan, Robert Feldman, Xin He, Sunmin Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Enhancement of women's autonomy is a key factor for improving women's health and nutrition. With nearly 12 million orphan and vulnerable children (OVC) in Africa due to HIV/AIDS, the study of OVC primary caregivers' nutrition is fundamental. We investigated the association between married women's autonomy and their nutritional status; explored whether this relationship was modified by OVC primary caregiving; and analyzed whether decision-making autonomy mediated the association between household wealth and body mass index (BMI). This cross-sectional study used the data from Demographic Health Surveys collected during 2006-2007 from 20-to 49-year-old women in Namibia (n = 2633), Swaziland (n = 1395), and Zambia (n = 2920). Analyses included logistic regression, Sobel, and Goodman tests. Our results indicated that women's educational attainment increased the odds for being overweight (Swaziland and Zambia) and decreased the odds for being underweight (Namibia). In Zambia, having at least primary education increased the odds for being overweight only among child primary caregivers regardless of the OVC status of the child, and having autonomy for buying everyday household items increased the odds for being overweight only among OVC primary caregivers. Decision-making autonomy mediated the association between household wealth and OVC primary caregivers' BMI in Zambia (Z = 2.13, p value = 0.03). We concluded that depending on each country's contextual characteristics, having education can decrease the odds for being an underweight woman or increase the odds for being an overweight woman. Further studies should explore why in Namibia education has an effect on women's overweight status only among women who are caring for a child.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1336-1345
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume26
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Orphaned Children
orphan
caregiving
Body Mass Index
autonomy
Zambia
Namibia
caregiver
Caregivers
Swaziland
Thinness
nutrition
Education
Decision Making
decision making
only child
Women's Rights
primary education
health
cross-sectional study

Keywords

  • Africa south of the Sahara
  • body mass index
  • caregivers
  • child
  • orphaned
  • overweight
  • personal autonomy
  • thinness
  • women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Orphan/vulnerable child caregiving moderates the association between women's autonomy and their BMI in three African countries. / Kanamori, Mariano; Carter-Pokras, Olivia; Madhavan, Sangeetha; Feldman, Robert; He, Xin; Lee, Sunmin.

In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, Vol. 26, No. 11, 02.11.2014, p. 1336-1345.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kanamori, Mariano ; Carter-Pokras, Olivia ; Madhavan, Sangeetha ; Feldman, Robert ; He, Xin ; Lee, Sunmin. / Orphan/vulnerable child caregiving moderates the association between women's autonomy and their BMI in three African countries. In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV. 2014 ; Vol. 26, No. 11. pp. 1336-1345.
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