Origins and functions of positive and negative affect: A control-process view

Charles S Carver, Michael F. Scheier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1599 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The question of how affect arises and what affect indicates is examined from a feedback-based viewpoint on self-regulation. Using the analogy of action control as the attempt to diminish distance to a goal, a second feedback system is postulated that senses and regulates the rate at which the action-guiding system is functioning. This second system is seen as responsible for affect. Implications of these assertions and issues that arise from them are addressed in the remainder of the article. Several issues relate to the emotion model itself; others concern the relation between negative emotion and disengagement from goals. Relations to 3 other emotion theories are also addressed. The authors conclude that this view on affect is a useful supplement to other theories and that the concept of emotion is easily assimilated to feedback models of self-regulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-35
Number of pages17
JournalPsychological Review
Volume97
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1 1990

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Emotions
Emotion
Self-Control
Self-regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Origins and functions of positive and negative affect : A control-process view. / Carver, Charles S; Scheier, Michael F.

In: Psychological Review, Vol. 97, No. 1, 01.12.1990, p. 19-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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