Oriented assembly of proteins on surfaces

Leonidas G Bachas, D. Bhattacharyya, Kimberly W. Anderson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Several approaches that facilitate the oriented assembly of proteins on a variety of surfaces, including membranes, will be described. Biotinylation reactions performed under controlled conditions were used to immobilize enzymes in a layer-by-layer fashion onto surfaces modified with avidin or streptavidin. For other enzymes, a specific attachment site was introduced by gene fusion or site-directed mutagenesis. These strategies were applied to achieve site-specific immobilization of several enzymes including alkaline phosphatase, organophosphorus hydrolase, horseradish peroxidase, and subtilisin. The site-specific immobilization led to orientation of the enzyme molecules on the surface of materials and to a higher activity compared to conventional immobilization methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
PublisherIEEE
Pages739
Number of pages1
Volume2
ISBN (Print)0780356756
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS) - Atlanta, GA, USA
Duration: Oct 13 1999Oct 16 1999

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS)
CityAtlanta, GA, USA
Period10/13/9910/16/99

Fingerprint

Enzymes
Proteins
Aryldialkylphosphatase
Subtilisin
Hydrolases
Mutagenesis
Streptavidin
Avidin
Phosphatases
Horseradish Peroxidase
Alkaline Phosphatase
Fusion reactions
Genes
Membranes
Molecules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Bachas, L. G., Bhattacharyya, D., & Anderson, K. W. (1999). Oriented assembly of proteins on surfaces. In Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings (Vol. 2, pp. 739). IEEE.

Oriented assembly of proteins on surfaces. / Bachas, Leonidas G; Bhattacharyya, D.; Anderson, Kimberly W.

Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings. Vol. 2 IEEE, 1999. p. 739.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Bachas, LG, Bhattacharyya, D & Anderson, KW 1999, Oriented assembly of proteins on surfaces. in Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings. vol. 2, IEEE, pp. 739, Proceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS), Atlanta, GA, USA, 10/13/99.
Bachas LG, Bhattacharyya D, Anderson KW. Oriented assembly of proteins on surfaces. In Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings. Vol. 2. IEEE. 1999. p. 739
Bachas, Leonidas G ; Bhattacharyya, D. ; Anderson, Kimberly W. / Oriented assembly of proteins on surfaces. Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings. Vol. 2 IEEE, 1999. pp. 739
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