Optimistic personality and psychosocial well-being during treatment predict psychosocial well-being among long-term survivors of breast cancer

Charles S Carver, Roselyn G. Smith, Michael H Antoni, Vida M. Petronis, Sharlene Weiss, Robert P. Derhagopian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

202 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In considering well-being among survivors of life-threatening illnesses such as breast cancer, 2 important questions are whether there is continuity between initial adjustment and longer term adjustment and what role personality plays in long-term adjustment. In this research, a sample of 163 early stage breast cancer patients whose psychosocial adjustment was first assessed during the year after surgery completed the same measures 5-13 years after surgery. Initial reports of well-being were relatively strong predictors of follow-up well-being on the same measures. Initial optimism and marital status also predicted follow-up adjustment, even controlling for earlier adjustment, which exerted a substantial unique effect in multivariate analyses. In contrast, initial medical variables played virtually no predictive role. There is substantial continuity of subjective well-being across many years among survivors of breast cancer, rooted partly in personality and social connection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)508-516
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

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Social Adjustment
Personality
Survivors
Breast Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Marital Status
Multivariate Analysis
Research

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Long-term survivors
  • Optimism
  • Personality
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Optimistic personality and psychosocial well-being during treatment predict psychosocial well-being among long-term survivors of breast cancer. / Carver, Charles S; Smith, Roselyn G.; Antoni, Michael H; Petronis, Vida M.; Weiss, Sharlene; Derhagopian, Robert P.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 24, No. 5, 01.09.2005, p. 508-516.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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