Optimism

Charles S Carver, Michael F. Scheier, Suzanne C. Segerstrom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

765 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Optimism is an individual difference variable that reflects the extent to which people hold generalized favorable expectancies for their future. Higher levels of optimism have been related prospectively to better subjective well-being in times of adversity or difficulty (i.e., controlling for previous well-being). Consistent with such findings, optimism has been linked to higher levels of engagement coping and lower levels of avoidance, or disengagement, coping. There is evidence that optimism is associated with taking proactive steps to protect one's health, whereas pessimism is associated with health-damaging behaviors. Consistent with such findings, optimism is also related to indicators of better physical health. The energetic, task-focused approach that optimists take to goals also relates to benefits in the socioeconomic world. Some evidence suggests that optimism relates to more persistence in educational efforts and to higher later income. Optimists also appear to fare better than pessimists in relationships. Although there are instances in which optimism fails to convey an advantage, and instances in which it may convey a disadvantage, those instances are relatively rare. In sum, the behavioral patterns of optimists appear to provide models of living for others to learn from.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)879-889
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Psychology Review
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

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Health
Optimism
Individuality
Pessimism

Keywords

  • Coping
  • Health
  • Optimism
  • Personality
  • Subjective well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Carver, C. S., Scheier, M. F., & Segerstrom, S. C. (2010). Optimism. Clinical Psychology Review, 30(7), 879-889. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2010.01.006

Optimism. / Carver, Charles S; Scheier, Michael F.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

In: Clinical Psychology Review, Vol. 30, No. 7, 01.11.2010, p. 879-889.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carver, CS, Scheier, MF & Segerstrom, SC 2010, 'Optimism', Clinical Psychology Review, vol. 30, no. 7, pp. 879-889. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2010.01.006
Carver CS, Scheier MF, Segerstrom SC. Optimism. Clinical Psychology Review. 2010 Nov 1;30(7):879-889. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2010.01.006
Carver, Charles S ; Scheier, Michael F. ; Segerstrom, Suzanne C. / Optimism. In: Clinical Psychology Review. 2010 ; Vol. 30, No. 7. pp. 879-889.
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