Optimal use of an occlusive dressing to enhance healing. Effect of delayed application and early removal on wound healing

W. H. Eaglstein, S. C. Davis, A. L. Mehle, P. M. Mertz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the effect of delayed application and early removal of a polyurethane dressing on excisional wounds in swine. Backs of pigs were wounded with an electrokeratome, and wounds were divided into the following treatment groups: (1) air exposed; (2) dressings applied immediately after wounding and kept on until wounds were evaluated; (3) dressings applied immediately after wounding and removed at 6, 24, or 48 hours; and (4) dressings applied 2, 6, and 24 hours after wounding. Wounds were excised on days 3 through 7 and incubated in sodium bromide to allow separation of the epidermis and dermis. Specimens were considered healed if no defect was present. To promote optimal resurfacing in superficial wounds, polyurethane dressings need to be applied within two hours after wounding and should be kept in place for at least a 24-hour period.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)392-395
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Dermatology
Volume124
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

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Occlusive Dressings
Bandages
Wound Healing
Wounds and Injuries
Polyurethanes
Swine
Dermis
Epidermis
Air

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Optimal use of an occlusive dressing to enhance healing. Effect of delayed application and early removal on wound healing. / Eaglstein, W. H.; Davis, S. C.; Mehle, A. L.; Mertz, P. M.

In: Archives of Dermatology, Vol. 124, No. 3, 01.01.1988, p. 392-395.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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