Optimal placement of actuators in actively controlled structures using genetic algorithms

Singiresu S Rao, Tzong Shii Pan, Vipperla B. Venkayya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

139 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The discrete optimal actuator location selection problem in actively controlled structures is cast in the framework of a zero-one optimization problem. A genetic algorithmic approach is developed to solve this zero-one optimization problem. To obtain successive generations that yield the solution corresponding to the maximum fitness value, this approach involves three basic operations: reproduction, crossover, and mutation. It can produce a global-optimal solution or a near-global-optimal solution if a sufficient number of generations are considered. Simplicity and parallel processing properties are the two attractive features of genetic algorithms. An example is presented to demonstrate the approach.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)942-943
Number of pages2
JournalAIAA Journal
Volume29
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Actuators
Genetic algorithms
Processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering

Cite this

Optimal placement of actuators in actively controlled structures using genetic algorithms. / Rao, Singiresu S; Pan, Tzong Shii; Venkayya, Vipperla B.

In: AIAA Journal, Vol. 29, No. 6, 01.06.1991, p. 942-943.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rao, Singiresu S ; Pan, Tzong Shii ; Venkayya, Vipperla B. / Optimal placement of actuators in actively controlled structures using genetic algorithms. In: AIAA Journal. 1991 ; Vol. 29, No. 6. pp. 942-943.
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